Poultry – D Sharma http://dsharma.org/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 17:00:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://dsharma.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Poultry – D Sharma http://dsharma.org/ 32 32 Corn and soybean prices intrigue analysts https://dsharma.org/corn-and-soybean-prices-intrigue-analysts/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 17:00:50 +0000 https://dsharma.org/corn-and-soybean-prices-intrigue-analysts/ KANSAS CITY, MO. – Corn and soybean futures hold up despite recent forecasts from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) that the two 2021 harvests will be the second largest in history, and there are several bearish indicators additional which suggest that the prices should be lower. Instead, corn, soybean and wheat futures have […]]]>

KANSAS CITY, MO. – Corn and soybean futures hold up despite recent forecasts from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) that the two 2021 harvests will be the second largest in history, and there are several bearish indicators additional which suggest that the prices should be lower.

Instead, corn, soybean and wheat futures have traded at multi-year highs this year, including winter wheat contracts near Kansas City and Chicago reaching multi-year highs and with the Minneapolis spring wheat future setting an 11-year high in the first half of November. .

Some analysts are unable to explain the bullish sentiment in the corn and soybean markets given strong production and the outlook for declining US exports due to favorable weather conditions in South America for both crops with the key harvest of Brazilian soybeans that will hit the export market in a few months. months should be a record. The 16-month high in the value of the US dollar last week adds even more decline to exports as it makes US grains more expensive for foreign buyers. China’s purchases of US soybeans and especially corn have been slow compared to the start of the year, another downward factor in the markets.

The USDA in its November crop production report estimated 2021 corn production at 15,062 million bushels, up 0.3% from its October forecast, up 7% from to 2020 and the second highest on record after 15,148 million bushels in 2016. Average yield based on Nov Conditions of .1 were forecast at an all-time high of 177 bushels per acre, up 0.5 bushels from October and 5.6 bushels from 2020. The harvested area for grain was forecast at 85.1 million acres, unchanged from previous forecasts and up 3% from 2020.

USDA corn production and average yield forecast were both slightly above average trade expectations, but corn futures prices rose further after the reports.

“If you had said in August that we would have a record corn yield, I would have said you were crazy,” said Paul Meyers, vice president, commodity analysis, Foresight Commodity Services Inc., referring in party to concerns about drought in some key growing areas during the summer.

In addition to the bountiful harvest, Meyers said other bearish characteristics of the corn market included a declining export outlook, high corn production in South America and a decline in the US herd, although he had noted that aggregate demand has held up well. Corn price support has increased the use of corn for ethanol, possible concerns over La Niña over South American production, and ideas that American farmers could plant fewer acres of corn in 2022 due to significantly higher production costs and the prices of fertilizers in particular.

The USDA in its World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) report of November 9 projected the carryover of corn on September 1, 2022, at 1,493 million bushels, up 21% from this year. Meyers expects the delay to 2022 could increase by an additional 100 million bushels if exports are cut in subsequent WASDE reports, which he expects.

“I thought we would see more weakness with a 1.5 billion bushel carry-over,” Meyers said. He expects March 2022 corn futures to fall into the $ 5.30 to $ 5.40 a bushel range, down from around $ 5.70 last week, “especially given the weather. South America is supportive “.

“It’s a puzzle,” he added. “Not just for corn, but also for soybeans. “

U.S. soybean production in 2021 was forecast at 4,425 million bushels, down 0.5% from October but up 5% and the second highest on record after 4,428 million bushels in 2018. The average yield based on November 1st conditions was forecast at 51.2 bushels per acre, down 0.3 bushels from October but up 0.2 bushels from 2020. The expected average yield would also be the second highest on record. Harvested area was forecast at 86.4 million acres, unchanged from previous forecasts but up 5% from 2020.

The USDA has forecast the postponement of US soybeans on September 1, 2022, to 340 million bushels, up 33% from 2021. A drop of 40 million bushels from October in exports forecast for 2021-22 more than offset a 23 million bushel reduction in estimated soybean production in 2021.

Both soybean production and USDA average yield forecast were below average trade expectations.

“I think the market was tilting the wrong way” on the expectations of the USDA soybean numbers, expecting higher production and yield but getting lower estimates for both, Meyers said.

“The data does not add up to $ 12.50 a bushel of soybeans,” Meyers said. He expects soybean futures in March to trade in the $ 12 a bushel zone. That would equate to soybean oil futures of around 56 to 57 a pound, down from around 57 currently, as oil’s share of soybean grinding has recently declined.

Wheat futures, on the other hand, provide additional support to corn and soybean futures due to declining global wheat supplies. Wheat supply and use forecasts, especially global figures, have become more optimistic. The USDA in its November 9 WASDE report forecast the global ending wheat stocks for 2021-22 at 277.18 million tonnes, down 4.2% from 2020-21.

The maize crop had been harvested at 91% as of Nov. 14, behind 94% at the same time last year but ahead of the 2016-2020 average of 86%, the USDA said in its weekly Crop Progress report. The soybean crop was 92% combined on the same date, slightly below 95% a year ago and 93% on average over five years. The USDA does not update the corn and soybean production estimates in December, so the next update will be in the 2021 Crop Production Summary in early January.

With the two largest US harvests largely “in the bin,” or of known size, the USDA forecast is unlikely to see any major revisions in January. Thus, changes in the market will require increased demand or adverse weather conditions in South America to reduce the outlook for corn and soybean supplies.

“I don’t have a good explanation as to why the prices haven’t come down further,” Meyers said, noting that “the bulls may be counting on bad weather in South America.”


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Indian parliament passes bill to repeal agricultural laws https://dsharma.org/indian-parliament-passes-bill-to-repeal-agricultural-laws/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 12:29:51 +0000 https://dsharma.org/indian-parliament-passes-bill-to-repeal-agricultural-laws/ This decision is the result of relentless pressure from Indian farmers who protested for over a year, Reuters reported. Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s administration introduced farm bills last year through an executive order, traditionally reserved for emergency legislation, triggering the longest protest by Indian farmers. Parliament then passed the legislation by voice vote, sparking widespread […]]]>

This decision is the result of relentless pressure from Indian farmers who protested for over a year, Reuters reported.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s administration introduced farm bills last year through an executive order, traditionally reserved for emergency legislation, triggering the longest protest by Indian farmers. Parliament then passed the legislation by voice vote, sparking widespread criticism that it rushed through the laws without proper debate.

In a bid to end protests ahead of the assembly elections in India’s most populous state of Uttar Pradesh early next year, Modi said this month that his government would repeal the laws at the new session of parliament.

As parliament convened for its winter session on Monday, the lower and upper houses passed the bill to withdraw laws aimed at deregulating and opening up agricultural markets for businesses. Farmers said the laws would give them little bargaining power against large private buyers.

The controversial laws have seen tens of thousands of people, including many elderly producers and women farmers, brave extreme weather conditions and a second severe wave of coronavirus infections to camp on the outskirts of New Delhi in the past year.

In addition to their demand for repeal, the protesting farmers are also calling on the Modi administration to introduce a law to guarantee government prices for products other than rice and wheat.

The government currently buys rice and wheat at state-set Minimum Support Prices (MSPs), but the subsidies only benefit about 6% of the millions of Indian farmers.

Protesters are demanding MSPs for all crops – a move that galvanized producers across the country and pushed the protest beyond the Indian grain states of Punjab and Haryana.

The government has yet to comment on the demand from the MSP protesters.

Farmers celebrated the development, but said the protest would only be canceled when the government promised PSM legislation for all products.


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Indian farmers hold soybeans as demand stabilizes https://dsharma.org/indian-farmers-hold-soybeans-as-demand-stabilizes/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 11:15:43 +0000 https://dsharma.org/indian-farmers-hold-soybeans-as-demand-stabilizes/ As farmers continued to conserve their crops, oilseed crushing in India declined. This could force the country to increase its imports of edible oils such as soybean oil, palm oil and sunflower oil, Reuters reported. However, local soybean production is expected to increase by more than a tenth from a year ago. At the start […]]]>

As farmers continued to conserve their crops, oilseed crushing in India declined. This could force the country to increase its imports of edible oils such as soybean oil, palm oil and sunflower oil, Reuters reported.

However, local soybean production is expected to increase by more than a tenth from a year ago.

At the start of MY 2020/21 in October 2020, soybean futures were trading at around Rs 3,800, but prices jumped to a record Rs 10,680 in August 2021 due to production weaker and strong demand from the poultry industry.

Rising prices prompted farmers to expand the area planted with soybeans.

But before farmers could harvest their new crops, New Delhi took a series of measures to lower the prices of soybean meal and edible oil, including allowing the very first imports of genetically modified soybean meal and by reducing import taxes on edible oil.

The measures triggered a collapse in local soybean futures prices to around 5,200 rupees in late October, before the market slowly recovered to around 6,600 rupees this week, more than a third below early August levels. .

Declining soybean crushing levels are in turn leading to lower soybean meal supplies, just as demand for feed from the poultry sector has picked up, said Manoj Agrawal, general manager of exporter Maharashtra. Oil Extractions.

Last week, the All India Poultry Breeders Association asked the government to allow the import of 550,000 tonnes of soybean meal.


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Three siblings’ poultry dream makes wings fly https://dsharma.org/three-siblings-poultry-dream-makes-wings-fly/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 21:03:11 +0000 https://dsharma.org/three-siblings-poultry-dream-makes-wings-fly/ Business Three siblings’ poultry dream makes wings fly Tuesday 23 November 2021 Benjamin Jaoko feeds their chicken in Yala. PHOTO | BOWL By PETER CHANGTOEKMore from this author Summary Benjamin Jaoko, 39, Samuel Opondo, 28, and Keith Odek, 24, saw a gap in poultry farming and decided to take advantage of it. They created the […]]]>

Business

Three siblings’ poultry dream makes wings fly


Benjamin Jaoko feeds their chicken in Yala. PHOTO | BOWL

Summary

  • Benjamin Jaoko, 39, Samuel Opondo, 28, and Keith Odek, 24, saw a gap in poultry farming and decided to take advantage of it.
  • They created the Modern Homestead Poultry Farm in Yala, Siaya County.

Benjamin Jaoko, 39, Samuel Opondo, 28, and Keith Odek, 24, saw a gap in poultry farming and decided to take advantage of it.

They created the Modern Homestead Poultry Farm in Yala, Siaya County.

“We mainly deal with poultry farming. We cover and supply chicks of all stages, from one day to eight weeks old, ”says Jaoko.

“We started this project in 2020 on the brink of a pandemic, but it was our long-standing dream and passion.”

They started with a capital of Sh 10,000, which they used to buy 50 chicks and cover other costs.

“We started with 50 chicks that we bought from a local hatchery in Kisumu. We mainly breed Kuroilers, a variety of improved kienyeji, ”reveals the farmer.

“As the name suggests, this is a family property project that only needs limited space (house). We use Bidco feed for our poultry. We normally feed them twice a day; it’s morning and evening, ”he notes, adding that they buy poultry feed from the Bidco dealer in Kisumu.

Mr. Jaoko says they currently have 1,000 birds, but there was a time when they had around 1,500.

The young entrepreneurs do not sell eggs, but hatch them to obtain chicks which they sell to customers in various parts of the country.

“We sell chicks of all stages, from one day to eight weeks old,” adds the farmer.

The three siblings use a free range and deep litter system for raising poultry.

“We sell day-old chicks at Sh 115 each, week-old chicks at Sh 145, Sh 175 at two weeks, Sh 215 at three weeks,” Jaoko explains.

They sell four weeks at Sh265, five weeks at Sh285, six weeks Sh315, seven weeks Sh340 and eight weeks Sh365.

“We use online marketing platforms and a website to attract our customers. These include Mkulima Young, WhatsApp, Facebook, Jiji, Instagram, Google, among others, ”reveals Jaoko.

The trio have faced a number of challenges in their professional journey. Pests and diseases, such as Newcastle, are some of the drawbacks they encounter. Market uncertainty and the high cost of poultry feed are other key obstacles they face.

Poultry manure is a business spinoff. They use the chicken droppings to grow crops and the surplus they sell to other farmers.

“This is a good company that I know for sure, but needs dedication and passion that drives you. I would like to say to those who want to start, have no fear,” Mr. Jaoko advises aspiring entrepreneurs.

“We plan to expand and grow and reach the entire universe, at a time when the world is moving away from red meat. White meat is ideal for creating a source of income, ”advises the breeder.

Their income depends on the market and the sales they make.

“We would like to reach out to the community in which we live, eventually our country and ultimately the whole world. We will interact with other farmers and help where we can, ”says the farmer.


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Traditional Norfolk Poultry boss denounces worker uncertainty https://dsharma.org/traditional-norfolk-poultry-boss-denounces-worker-uncertainty/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 17:14:00 +0000 https://dsharma.org/traditional-norfolk-poultry-boss-denounces-worker-uncertainty/ Posted: 5:14 PM November 19, 2021 Two months ago, a looming disaster caused by shortages of workers over the holidays kept poultry farmer Mark Gorton from sleeping at night. Tonight it will be bird flu as the seasonal threat hangs over the UK and strict restrictions are in place across the UK. This fear will […]]]>

Posted:
5:14 PM November 19, 2021



Two months ago, a looming disaster caused by shortages of workers over the holidays kept poultry farmer Mark Gorton from sleeping at night.

Tonight it will be bird flu as the seasonal threat hangs over the UK and strict restrictions are in place across the UK.

This fear will hang over him until the last of his free range herds – scattered outside across 65 farms in Norfolk, Suffolk and Essex – are brought back inside on December 18 to be slaughtered for the Christmas market. .

He will then be replaced by other nightmares about how to find workers to treat his slowly maturing birds for the 2022 Christmas season.


Mark Gorton, MD at Traditional Norfolk Poultry, says turkey industry needs more certainty
– Credit: TNP / Mark Gorton

Based in Shropham, near Attleborough, Traditional Norfolk Poultry (TNP) supplies hundreds of thousands of premium free-range turkeys for the holiday market. In the weeks leading up to Christmas, its 300 employees will be bolstered by 400 festive poultry workers brought together from Romania, Bulgaria and Ukraine by Concordia and AG Recruitment – two of the four agencies responsible for bringing in foreign nationals to work in the UK under a temporary visa regime introduced just two months ago.

The visa – which expires on December 31 – was hastily introduced on September 25 after angry farmers warned there would be few cultivated turkeys in Britain to adorn the UK’s festive dinner table this Christmas unless the government takes action and gives it workers to plug the growing gaps.

Mark now heaves a sigh of relief that he will get through December with enough workers to get him across the festive finish line – but the government has taken an ad hoc approach and it is not yet clear whether the program will be. relaunched next year. .

However, the main concern right now is bird flu. As an outdoor grower, he cannot bring his herds indoors – as they would lose their premium status – until or unless ordered by the Ministry of the Environment, to Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA).

On November 3, it declared an Avian Flu Prevention Zone (AIPZ) across Britain, but the stringent biosecurity measures that entail – such as feeding and watering birds at the shelter – were already in place at NPT farms, said Mark, its managing director.

Nevertheless, the threat is constant as migrating wild birds can introduce the disease at any time.

On November 11, H5N1 was found in birds at premises in Kirby Cross near Frinton-on-Sea – bringing it to Essex following cases in other parts of the country. This was confirmed to be a highly pathogenic H5N1 strain and birds from the affected flock were culled while a temporary control zone was placed around the premises.

Farmers live with risks when choosing which crop to grow and how many animals to keep. They know they can face disease and weather issues, making every season a gamble. And bird flu can still strike a flock outside even when all precautions have been taken and properly observed.

But what annoys Mark is the question of recruiting. According to him, all the government’s new post-Brexit rules do in this case is export the labor because the labor cannot be brought in – only to import the finished product. Thus, a food import is created from what was a local product. At the same time, the demand for British turkeys is increasing. This means that many consumers will have to buy a lower quality imported product made at a lower standard, he argues.

“It just doesn’t make sense. We have all these farms and factories to make these products, ”he says. “It really pisses me off because we’ve all built our businesses and we’ve literally had the carpet under our feet.”

Despite numerous calls, it has not been possible to find British labor for its seasonal workforce, he says. About a quarter of its permanent staff are British while the rest are members of the European Union with colonized status. “There’s no one outside,” he said. “No one ever said, ‘I don’t want to employ Englishmen’, but the simple facts of life are that they are not there. I haven’t had a single Englishman who applied for a job. .

Additional workers under the temporary scheme have now arrived at TNP and the slaughter and processing of birds has started this week. But across the industry there will be fewer British turkeys this Christmas.

“Yeah, we got a visa, and yeah, he basically saved the day at the 11th hour,” he says.

Even so, turkey farmers are very frustrated that although fruit and vegetable producers are benefiting from a new Seasonal Agricultural Worker Scheme (SAWS) that allows seasonal workers to plant and pick their crops, they have been treated differently. Before Brexit, workers from Eastern Europe in particular came seasonally, working throughout the season, from picking berries to picking vegetables to picking pumpkins.
in the fall, then move seamlessly to processing the turkey.

Now they are so tightly controlled that they have to go home to come back under a different regime.

“It makes us all so angry because you can see what’s going on. It just doesn’t make sense. We have all these farms and factories to make these products.

By the time the recruitment crisis erupted this summer, premium producers like TNP had already rolled the dice and were well into fattening their birds. They start with their day old poults in April-May while mass productions start in August-September.

This meant that very large-scale producers reduced their volumes for fear of not having the manpower to process them. This meant that farms that would normally fill up with birds in the summer did not do so at the same rate.

The British Poultry Council (BPC) – the industry’s trade body – said easing pressure on the workforce means the industry will now ‘overstep the line’ – although the choice is. more restricted at Christmas.

BPC chief executive Richard Griffiths said there would be a bird for “anyone who wants one”.

“We have been able to rationalize the products and reduce the variety, which contributes to the overall volume,” he said.

However, Mark says they will be in short supply.

“There will be fewer British turkeys on the market this year – I’m 100% sure,” he predicts.

“The big companies have downsized because they feared they would not have a workforce – the government did not announce this visa until very late in the day.

The end result was fewer British turkeys, he says.

“It makes no economic sense, it makes no moral sense.”


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NGO helps Zim families get started in poultry and hydroponic gardening https://dsharma.org/ngo-helps-zim-families-get-started-in-poultry-and-hydroponic-gardening/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 12:45:43 +0000 https://dsharma.org/ngo-helps-zim-families-get-started-in-poultry-and-hydroponic-gardening/ Hydroponics By Lawrence Paganga A total of 940 families from Gweru, Zimbabwe, ventured into small agriculture-based self-income projects as part of the Urban Resilience Building Projects supported by the German Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) Welthungerhilfe. This week, the NGO visited the projects in Mtapa, a low-income suburb of Gweru. Welthungerhilfe representative Fanny Nyaunga said projects implemented […]]]>
Hydroponics

By Lawrence Paganga

A total of 940 families from Gweru, Zimbabwe, ventured into small agriculture-based self-income projects as part of the Urban Resilience Building Projects supported by the German Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) Welthungerhilfe.

This week, the NGO visited the projects in Mtapa, a low-income suburb of Gweru.

Welthungerhilfe representative Fanny Nyaunga said projects implemented by residents include poultry, hydroponic gardening and peanut butter making as part of the Urban Resilience Project in partnership with the World Food Program ( PAM).

“We have taken some households and helped them with at least four sustainable projects that ensure that even when financial assistance ends, there is continuity and that families have sources of income and can support themselves,” did he declare.

A beneficiary of the hydroponic gardening project system had enabled him to achieve rapid harvests within four weeks.

“In four weeks, I can harvest crops and vegetables using this unique farming technique,” ​​she said.

“Considering the water crisis we are facing in this city, hydroponics is efficient and has not only provided good nutrition for my family, but it is also a source of income. Hydroponics is the future! It uses less water.

Hydroponic gardening is a method of growing plants without soil. The water is mixed with nutrients and goes directly to the roots of the plant.

Another elderly beneficiary involved in poultry farming said that thanks to the project, he was now able to care for his orphaned grandchildren using the company’s proceeds.

“However, our call is for donors to increase the number of chicks they give to each recipient,” he said.

Nyaunga from Welthungerhilfe commended WFP for its support in promoting dynamic approaches to achieve zero hunger.

The project is being carried out as part of the Urban Resilience Building project to increase knowledge about hydroponic agriculture.


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Optimism seen as U.S. agriculture heads to 2022 https://dsharma.org/optimism-seen-as-u-s-agriculture-heads-to-2022/ Fri, 05 Nov 2021 12:45:45 +0000 https://dsharma.org/optimism-seen-as-u-s-agriculture-heads-to-2022/ Fox discussed his prospects at Extension of Oklahoma State University 2021 Rural Economic Outlook Conference in October, where he addressed the long-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, shrinking workforce, impacts of drought on livestock supply, the concentration of packers, the profitability of poultry, the political opinions he has seen emerge from Washington DC and more. […]]]>

Fox discussed his prospects at Extension of Oklahoma State University 2021 Rural Economic Outlook Conference in October, where he addressed the long-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, shrinking workforce, impacts of drought on livestock supply, the concentration of packers, the profitability of poultry, the political opinions he has seen emerge from Washington DC and more.

“Overall commodity prices are doing quite well, especially grains and especially cotton,” Fox said. “Cattle prices could be a little better, but they’re not terrible. The most obvious challenges are some key risks on the farm inputs side.”

Among the challenges listed by Fox:

  • There are going to be shortages of chemicals and fertilizers due to plant closures and logistical issues.
  • Fertilizer prices are going to be higher the rest of this year and through 2022.
  • Supply chain issues will continue to plague producers for the foreseeable future.

“Repair parts for tractors, equipment blades, forage chippers, pesticides and herbicides; you name it, there are going to be delays and shortages, ”Fox said. “As a former dairy farmer, I can attest that a producer can have big problems if a piece of equipment breaks down. To combat this, keep more spare parts on hand, if possible, and stick to a well-designed maintenance schedule. ”

OSU Extension Area Farm Economics Specialist Trent Milacek agrees with Fox and recommends Oklahoma growers take whatever steps they can to ensure they have a plan in place for several months. or more to mitigate the negative effects of potential challenges.

“Buy your fertilizer supplies, even if you have to keep them in a shed,” Milacek said. “Take advantage of the current good crop prices; futures contract, look at futures prices, lock in what you can. There is not much that an individual producer can do about the details of the current trade negotiations, but producers must be careful and manage the fallout and associated effects as best they can.

The ongoing trade negotiations between the United States and China could be particularly important. The current Phase 1 agreement expires at the end of this year. Most analysts agree that US agriculture has done well overall. Unfortunately, other segments of the US economy have not.

“Producers and agribusiness leaders need to watch what happens with the upcoming negotiations as America tries to get something better on all levels,” Fox said. “There is going to be a lot of pressure from various industries on negotiators. ”

Protein outlook

Protein production is expected to do well in 2022. The world is demanding access to more meat – beef, chicken, pork, Fox recently told the farm television program. SUNRISE.

“The United States is the most efficient meat producer in the world,” he said. “As long as we have a level playing field, there should be strong international markets for American meat, although some types are more popular than others in specific countries, as always.”

On the home front, most beef cattle will need additional feed in addition to hay this winter. The amount and type of supplement depends on the type and amount of hay available. Crop and feed prices are significantly higher this year, in part due to the export-oriented corn market. Current corn prices in the southern Great Plains are 40 to 50% higher than the same time last year.

“Hay prices in Oklahoma are up 23.5% year-over-year and 10.6% in Texas compared to the same period last year,” said Derrell Peel, hay specialist. livestock marketing at OSU Extension. “Increasing feed costs have negatively affected feedlots for several months. The impacts will increase as cow-calf and feeder producers face additional feed and supplement needs this winter. Plan for these needs now.

OSU Extension recommends that producers start the process by increasing their awareness of the nutritional needs of cattle according to the stages of production. Analysis and weighing of hay will help determine the nutritional contribution of hay to meeting livestock needs, and careful feeding of hay can help reduce waste and increase reserves.

Fact sheets detailing research-based information and recommendations for managing farm and ranch costs are available in line and through OSU Extension County Offices.

In terms of overall earnings projections for farms and ranches, commodity prices will be high, but most industry analysts, including Fox, don’t expect producers and agro-dealers. -industrials are bearing the brunt of the cost increases this year. On the contrary, the increases will be felt the hardest on income generated by crops and livestock next year.


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Imrul’s smart poultry farm without antibiotics https://dsharma.org/imruls-smart-poultry-farm-without-antibiotics/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://dsharma.org/imruls-smart-poultry-farm-without-antibiotics/ Fri Nov 5, 2021 12:00 AM Last update: Fri Nov 5, 2021 1:30 AM Shykh Seraj chats with Imrul Hasan at his organic smart poultry farm in Baraitali village in Kaliakair upazila in Gazipur. Photo: Hridoye Mati O Manush “> Shykh Seraj chats with Imrul Hasan at his organic smart poultry farm in Baraitali village […]]]>

Shykh Seraj chats with Imrul Hasan at his organic smart poultry farm in Baraitali village in Kaliakair upazila in Gazipur. Photo: Hridoye Mati O Manush

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Shykh Seraj chats with Imrul Hasan at his organic smart poultry farm in Baraitali village in Kaliakair upazila in Gazipur. Photo: Hridoye Mati O Manush

People often hear parents say, “My kids don’t want to eat fish. Kids love chicken more than fish and that means the demand for chicken is increasing. But when it comes to healthy foods, people take a different view of chicken meat. Doubts about the use of antibiotics in poultry farms are not at all an unreasonable topic of discussion. Not only chicken or any other meats, even eggs and milk are strongly affected by antibiotics. If a drug is administered, it stays in that animal’s body for a period of time. Each drug has a specific “hold period” and it stays in the animal’s body until it is drained. Drug residues are called drug residues, and antibiotic residues are likely to remain in fish, poultry or livestock meat, eggs and milk. Although we take it unknowingly without hesitation, it poses a serious threat to our health. With that in mind, people are now looking for organic foods and now is the time to overcome the uncertainty of a safe diet. The whole world is moving in this direction as the demand for organic food steadily increases. Over the years, a large organic food market is taking shape across the world and many are engaging in day-to-day organic food production.

Now let’s talk about computer engineer Imrul Hasan. I met him recently. The young man becomes a real soldier in organic food production by starting a smart poultry farm, absolutely free from the use of antibiotics.

The Bangshai River flows past the village of Baraitali in the Kaliakair upazila in Gazipur. A few days ago, I visited the ancestral two-story house of Imrul, located by the river. After obtaining his engineering degree from the Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET), he joined the telecommunications industry. He worked in the country for three years and six more years in the United States, Egypt, the Philippines, Abu Dhabi and other countries.

“I felt the need to return to the country for two reasons. One is to take care of the schooling of my parents and my daughter as she was forced to change schools six times just for my work places. “said Imrul.

In October 2014, Imrul returned to Bangladesh and engaged in IT consulting. Everything was fine until the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and things have changed since then. Imrul was infected with the deadly virus and had to be hospitalized. “Lying on the hospital bed, I thought about our immune system. Our food does not protect our health at all while food adulteration invisibly destroys us, ”explained Imrul.

After returning from the hospital, Imrul began to study organic chicken production. “In December 2020 I started my organic chicken farm and so far I have received a huge positive response from customers,” Imrul added with pleasure.

Imrul has temperature checks on his farm to determine the appropriate amount of light, air and water management system, which we can define as smart farming. Everything on the farm is controlled by a computer. Imrul has broiler chicken in a section, which has enough space for the chickens to grow up in a free environment. I remember seeing this method in a chicken farm in Japan. They kept chickens in the shed but kept the chickens free so they could roam in open places. I saw the same method at Linz Hall Farm in Newcastle, England. Imrul has 750 broilers.

How can you be so sure that your day-old chicks are free from antibiotics since you are buying them outside? I asked.

“It’s hard to give a guarantee from the start, but after 10 days there will be no residue for sure,” Imrul replied.

What is the mortality rate on your farm? I asked. It’s down to two or three percent now, he replied. “I take care of the health of the chickens organically. I feed them apple cider vinegar, which boosts their immune system, ”Imrul said.

I have seen chickens being fed granulated feed as well as red spinach, moringa leaves, etc. at the Imrul farm. There are 3000 colorful birds, on another side of the farm. He also raises around 150 free-space chickens. He experiments in several ways. Imrul is quite energetic. Thoughts are as clean as his workplace. Three thousand other colorful birds in another part of the farm are quite large in size and suitable for sale. I wanted to know, the state of the market. He said all of his chickens are sold online. After slaughtering, cleaning and slicing them properly, their staff delivers them to the customer’s home in a refrigerated van. “I sell my chickens for 250 Tk (2.9 USD) per KG,” he said.

Chicken is sold between 160 Tk and 165 Tk (1.9 USD) per kg in the market, don’t you charge a high price? I asked. Imrul gave me the answer by taking me to the feed production area. It is a very old house. He installed two state-of-the-art machines for the production of poultry feed. “If you want to keep your chickens healthy naturally and without giving them antibiotics, you have to feed them healthy food,” he replied. The cost is therefore higher to ensure healthy chicken production. However, we’re still trying to figure out how to cut costs, Imrul suggested.

Imrul said: “I had the courage to invest in agriculture by watching your show and it was you who said that if you go into agriculture with a correct understanding, the fear of loss decreases. I walk with this inspiration. “

Our chicken production has increased. If the young, educated generation takes the lead in the agricultural sector, the image of agriculture will change. After Imrul, many more will come forward to build smart organic poultry farms. Someday, food safety will be ensured through the initiatives of young minds like Imrul Hasan. The media should stand alongside young entrepreneurs alongside government and NGOs. If an Imrul is successful, others will be inspired and a healthy Bangladesh will stand strong to produce safe food.


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84% of poultry farms raised water pollution problems: report https://dsharma.org/84-of-poultry-farms-raised-water-pollution-problems-report/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 21:16:02 +0000 https://dsharma.org/84-of-poultry-farms-raised-water-pollution-problems-report/ The poultry industry is facing further opposition following a study by an environmental watch group claiming that a high number of transactions resulted in at least one violation over a four-year period, and that few have paid penalties. A report from the Environmental Integrity Project found that 84% of the 182 Maryland poultry farms state […]]]>

The poultry industry is facing further opposition following a study by an environmental watch group claiming that a high number of transactions resulted in at least one violation over a four-year period, and that few have paid penalties.

A report from the Environmental Integrity Project found that 84% of the 182 Maryland poultry farms state inspected between 2017 and 2020 had one or more violations of their water pollution control permits.

The report, released on Thursday, also noted that just four establishments, or 2% of the total, paid penalties, according to a broad investigation of public records.

James Fisher, communications director of the Delmarva Chicken Association, called the report in a statement a way to “cripple family chicken farm business models in the name of activism.”

According to the report’s findings, about two-thirds of the poultry farms that failed inspections had problems with waste management, such as manure left outside where rain could wash it into streams, inadequate waste storage facilities or unsanitary disposal of dead chickens.

More than half of the poultry operations for which records were available in 2019 reported to the state that they illegally applied manure to their crops in amounts greater than what their nutrient management plans allow.

However, the state did not impose any sanctions for these violations.

“The poultry industry on the coast produces (around) 600 million pounds of manure each year, and that’s far more than cropland can absorb,” said Eric Schaeffer, executive director of the Integrity Project. environmental protection and former director of civil law enforcement at the Environmental Protection Agency. “Phosphorus flows into streams and ends up in Chesapeake Bay and sucks oxygen from the water.”


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Insect-based protein – fad or panacea? https://dsharma.org/insect-based-protein-fad-or-panacea/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 07:08:08 +0000 https://dsharma.org/insect-based-protein-fad-or-panacea/ The insect protein produced from this process can be used as an ingredient for animal or human food. It appears that in Western markets, consumer acceptability will be a major barrier to marketing insect foods to humans. Therefore, it seems that the main market for insect protein will be in animal feed. Excellent source of […]]]>

The insect protein produced from this process can be used as an ingredient for animal or human food. It appears that in Western markets, consumer acceptability will be a major barrier to marketing insect foods to humans. Therefore, it seems that the main market for insect protein will be in animal feed.

Excellent source of protein

Many types of insects can be cultivated to produce protein. I will focus on the Soldier Black Flies (BSF), which is by far the favorite. I won’t go into the technical side except to say that BSF larvae eggs are laid out on a substrate of organic waste, for example, poultry litter, mortality and slaughterhouse waste. The eggs hatch and develop into larvae. The larvae feed on organic waste. They are harvested after about 12 days and processed into oils or flours with a high protein content. The protein is very rich and has a good balance of amino acids. The residue is a valuable organic fertilizer. If the larvae are allowed to pupate into flies, these can be used to reproduce the next generation.

Why is the use of insect protein valuable for the poultry industry?

Sustainability and environment

The poultry industry is frequently attacked as being unsustainable. The reasoning is that it takes about 2 kg of food ingredients to produce 1 kg of chicken meat product. With the use of insects, almost all waste is converted back into protein and fat for food or into residue for fertilizer. Thus, the poultry economy becomes much more circular.

Sources of protein for animal feed

There are two main sources of protein for animal feed, soybeans and fishmeal, which are dangerous for the environment.

The growth of soybeans for animal feed is criticized as it is often grown on land from reclaimed tropical forests. It also competes with crops that could feed the local population. BSF can replace soybeans in animal feed. This would reduce the pressure to clear the rainforest so that more land can be used to produce soybeans as livestock farming expands.

The lucrative market for fishmeal for animal feed encourages fishing companies not to limit their yields of bycatch (from which fishmeal is made), and thus leads to ecosystem depletion, environmental damage and the collapse of local fisheries.

The use of BSF can replace both soybean meal, soybean oil and fishmeal with great environmental benefits.

The process of growing BSF from waste can be done locally without the need to transport the waste to large sites. It converts waste – litter and manure and other agricultural wastes – which are potential pollutants (ammonia, odor, water pollution), into stable and valuable resources.

The basic process, if it is well designed, will be energy efficient and will have no negative impact on the environment (odor, greenhouse gas emissions, groundwater pollution, etc.). With BSF treatment, direct greenhouse gas emissions are 47 times lower than windrow composting.

Economy

The poultry industry, which is essentially a means of converting plant protein into animal protein, faces a long-term challenge related to protein produced in the laboratory. The use of insect proteins is expected to increase the efficiency of the poultry industry and improve its position to face these challenges.

The first results seem to show that the use of insect protein in the diet improves the health of birds. It is also highly regarded in premium pet foods and in the aquamarine industry.

Where are we today ?

The BSF and insect protein industry is roughly at the stage of development that the renewable energy industry (mainly solar and wind power) was 30 years ago.

The basic science has been done and it is recognized that the process works technically. Pilot projects of commercial size exist all over the world. There are also a few large-scale producers, who keep most of the details under wraps for understandable business reasons.

Thirty years ago, renewable energies were not seen as a solution to fueling the global economy. It had a few niche applications and grew mainly on government grants and environmental activists. In 2021, renewable energies are competitive with fossil fuels. It is not only the main backbone of global attempts to contain global warming, but also the cheapest way to fuel an economy.

The main challenge preventing the large-scale deployment of BSF technology is cost. According to a Rabobank analysis, the cost of insect protein is typically $ 3,500 to $ 5,500 per metric ton. The equivalent price of fishmeal is between € 1,200 and € 2,000 per tonne.

So there is a vicious circle that needs to be broken: costs are high, so scale is low, but to reduce costs, we need scale. This is a classic situation calling for government intervention to encourage scaling. Before examining the role of government, we should take a closer look at the cost aspect.

  1. The main raw material of BSF in the poultry industry is poultry litter and slaughterhouse waste. These materials are available virtually free of charge. Although they have a use for fertilizer, among other uses, most farms pay to have their compost removed from the farm. So, practically the only material cost after raw material is a little energy to maintain a temperature of about 28-30 ° C and the cost of BSF eggs. What increases the high costs is the capital cost of the system and the cost of labor to operate it.
  2. Once scale is reached, increased automation will significantly reduce labor costs. Capital costs will be reduced by economies of scale and the development of flow technology rather than the more expensive batch technology.

Regulatory barriers

Another hurdle to overcome to reach scale is regulation. Regulations differ from country to country, but they basically fall into two categories:

  • Can insect proteins be used in animal feed?
  • If so, what wastes can insect larvae be fed from?

This summer, the European Union relaxed its regulations to allow the use of BSF for animal feed in the form of larvae as well as in the form of oil. This is in addition to its use in pet food and aquaculture, which has already been approved.

At the same time, EU regulations still prevent insects from feeding on animal waste, including litter.

Governments must recognize the beneficial effects of using insect farming. So, for example, it can be used as a safe and sustainable way to recycle agricultural waste. Policymakers should also consider ways to encourage the development of the industry.

I see a five-step process by which the cost of insect protein will drop to a level that will make it affordable and therefore in demand in large quantities.

  1. Development of a process flow technology that will work well with automation and lower capital costs
  2. Similar relaxation of regulations to allow the use of poultry litter and slaughterhouse waste as a substrate for insect growth. This will lower the cost of raw materials.
  3. Specialization of insect installations in breeding stock and protein production
  4. Ongoing research into the rearing process, ideal temperatures, etc., and how to provide producers with egg packs that can be activated when needed for production. This research is already being carried out by an Israeli bio-startup Freezem.
  5. All of this will lead to economies of scale to the point that it will be economically viable to compete with fishmeal and soybeans on their own merits.

Rabobank expects the cost of insect protein to fall below $ 2,000 by the end of the decade. At this price, the use of BSF should become widespread, thus transforming the poultry sector into an almost circular economy. This will allow it to increase its efficiency and improve its image.

Stanley kaye



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