Orchards – D Sharma http://dsharma.org/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 05:07:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://dsharma.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Orchards – D Sharma http://dsharma.org/ 32 32 Julian orchards facing ‘disaster’ after recent storms https://dsharma.org/julian-orchards-facing-disaster-after-recent-storms/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 05:07:00 +0000 https://dsharma.org/julian-orchards-facing-disaster-after-recent-storms/ Apple picking in Julian is a September tradition. But recent storms have devastated crops and some orchards have already closed for the season. JULIAN, Calif. — It’s a September tradition: heading to Julian to pick apples. But recent storms and a historic drought have limited opportunities this year, as many orchards are already closed for […]]]>

Apple picking in Julian is a September tradition. But recent storms have devastated crops and some orchards have already closed for the season.

JULIAN, Calif. — It’s a September tradition: heading to Julian to pick apples. But recent storms and a historic drought have limited opportunities this year, as many orchards are already closed for the season.

Apple picking is always fun, where you can find an open orchard and reach high enough to knock down one or two.

“A disaster for the city of Julian”

“We got hurt; I think we made about a third of the business we made in previous years,” said Roger Hedgecock, owner of Volcan Valley Apple Farm. “This is a disaster for the town of Julian because it’s not just me and the Volcan Valley Apple Farm orchard, but all the apple orchards in the area that are suffering.”

Hedgecock said Julian Orchards experienced winds of 80 to 90 mph, coupled with 4 1/2 inches of rain in one day.

“We like the rain but not the wind because it put half of our crop on the ground,” Hedgecock said.

Right now it’s slow on Main Street and around Julian.

“A lot of businesses that depend on a place like our 25 acre farm, it brings thousands of people here every year and when they don’t come or we have had to close it has really hurt a lot of businesses” , said Jim Madaffer. , owner of Julian Farm & Orchard.

What about Julian apple pies?

Yes, you can still buy a slice of pie.

Oscar Miranda, manager of Mom’s Pies of Julian, said, “You can still get apple pies, yes, definitely; we have lots of apple pies and all of our other varieties.”

Crowds are definitely down from the regular season, and next on the schedule are both Halloween and Thanksgiving.

Julian farms have had to deal not only with recent storms, but also with historic drought.

“We’re going to have thousands of pumpkins this fall. We haven’t grown them this year because of the drought; bring them in from Oregon and Idaho,” Madaffer said.

As for the devastated apple crop, it helps to have a sense of humor.

“Our motto, like some sports teams we know, is ‘Wait till next year,'” Hedgecock said.

There are still a few places left to pick apples this season. It is recommended to call ahead and make a reservation.

WATCH RELATED: Crowds head to Julian for remaining snow in the mountains (February 2022).

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6 local farms, orchards perfect for picking pumpkins this fall https://dsharma.org/6-local-farms-orchards-perfect-for-picking-pumpkins-this-fall/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 10:00:28 +0000 https://dsharma.org/6-local-farms-orchards-perfect-for-picking-pumpkins-this-fall/ Figuring out where to pick your pumpkin is arguably the most important decision you’ll make this fall. Pumpkin spice lattes and apple pies don’t last a week, but a freshly picked pumpkin is a month, sometimes a year commitment. Luckily, we’ve found farms and orchards to help solve this dilemma and provide advice on how […]]]>

Figuring out where to pick your pumpkin is arguably the most important decision you’ll make this fall. Pumpkin spice lattes and apple pies don’t last a week, but a freshly picked pumpkin is a month, sometimes a year commitment.

Luckily, we’ve found farms and orchards to help solve this dilemma and provide advice on how to choose the perfect pumpkin.

Take the scenic route:Scenic drives to view fall foliage (and stop for a meal) in Summit County

Visitors to Rufener Hilltop Farms in Suffield can throw pumpkins at old cars using a pneumatic cannon.

Rufener Hilltop Farms

Visitors have over 40,000 pumpkins of various shapes and sizes to choose from this year at Rufener Hilltop Farms.

To acquire a pumpkin, guests must choose from four packages ranging from $7 to $15 depending on the additional activities they choose. Passes cease to be sold at 5:30 p.m. each day.

Farm attractions include a 12-acre corn maze, corn pond and pumpkin cannon. For those looking for fall decorations, Rufener also sells corn stalks and straw bales.

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Make your choice in the U-pick orchards of the region https://dsharma.org/make-your-choice-in-the-u-pick-orchards-of-the-region/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 14:45:12 +0000 https://dsharma.org/make-your-choice-in-the-u-pick-orchards-of-the-region/ It’s a thriving business as they often have a few thousand people walking through their orchard on a fall weekend. The family business has become an annual destination for thousands of Miami Valley families. “I think that’s what makes the job so rewarding,” Peifer said. “I loved growing up here and I love being able […]]]>

It’s a thriving business as they often have a few thousand people walking through their orchard on a fall weekend. The family business has become an annual destination for thousands of Miami Valley families.

“I think that’s what makes the job so rewarding,” Peifer said. “I loved growing up here and I love being able to share the experience with others.”

ExploreOhio Renaissance Festival expects to reach new heights this season

Spending time in nature has been shown to positively impact physical and mental health, including improving sleep, boosting immune function, and boosting emotional well-being. With apple picking season in full swing, it can also be fun and delicious.

“Little kids learn where food really comes from and it’s great fun for families,” said Glenn Monnin of Monnin’s Fruit Farm. “We have people telling us that their grandparents brought them here when they were kids, and now they’re bringing their own kids.”

The Monnin fruit farm has been a staple of local U-pick for over 60 years. CONTRIBUTED

The Monnin fruit farm has been a staple of local U-pick for over 60 years. CONTRIBUTED

Monnin’s has been in business for over six decades, offering a variety of self-picked fruits year-round.

Apple picking is a fun fall tradition for a lot of people,” he said.

The tradition of apple picking is also alive and well at the Tüken Orchard and Farm Market.

Tuken’s Orchard & Farm Market in West Alexandria has 20 acres of fruit trees ripe for picking. CONTRIBUTED

Tuken's Orchard & Farm Market in West Alexandria has 20 acres of fruit trees ripe for picking.  CONTRIBUTED

Tuken’s Orchard & Farm Market in West Alexandria has 20 acres of fruit trees ripe for picking. CONTRIBUTED

“We have so many loyal customers,” said owner Mary Hora. “It’s their favorite place.”

The West Alexandria mainstay has a store and has expanded its in-house offerings to include ice cream, cider and even wine.

“But the biggest draw is the orchard,” Hora said.

ExploreYoung’s Jersey Dairy is launching pick your own pumpkins this weekend

Fee for picking – U-pick local apples

Sunny fall days are the perfect time for apple picking. CONTRIBUTED

Sunny fall days are the perfect time for apple picking.  CONTRIBUTED

Sunny fall days are the perfect time for apple picking. CONTRIBUTED

* Fruit Irons

What: U-pick apples by the bag or by the bushel, includes a wagon ride

Where: 1640 Stubbs Mill Road, Lebanon

Info: For updates, visit the farm’s Facebook page or call 513-932-2853.

* Monnin fruit farm

What: U-pick apples available daily

Where: 8201 Frederick Pike, Dayton

Info: For updates, visit the farm’s Facebook page, website www.monninsfruitfarm.com/ or call 937-890-4536.

The self-service apple orchards are bursting with seasonal fruit. CONTRIBUTED

The self-service apple <a class=orchards are bursting with seasonal fruit. CONTRIBUTED” class=”placeholder-image “/>

The self-service apple orchards are bursting with seasonal fruit. CONTRIBUTED

* Peifer orchards

What: U-pick apples – 20 varieties – are available on Saturdays and Sundays until October

Where: 4590 US 68 N., Yellow Springs

Info: Call 937-767-2208 or visit www.peiferorchards.com for current harvest reports or to subscribe to weekly harvest reports.

* The Pink House

What: Limited quantities of U-pick apples and organization of Apple Pick Day festivities on September 17 with refreshments and live entertainment.

Where: 5669 West Kessler-Cowlesville Road, West Milton

Info: Visit www.thepinkhouseorchard.com to check availability.

* Tüken Farm Orchard and Market

What: Apple picking days run through mid-October with over 30 varieties of apples, wagon rides available in the orchard

Where: 15725 Eaton Pike, West Alexandria

Info: Visit the orchard’s Facebook page for regular pick-your-own updates.

* Wesler Orchards

What: U-pick apples are available and cider season is underway at the orchard, which has been in business since 1930

Where: 9319 Wesler Road, New Paris

Info: Visit https://weslerorchards.com and Facebook for updates or call 937-437-8921.

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Celebrating the four seasons at the orchards of Terhune is a long-standing tradition on the farm https://dsharma.org/celebrating-the-four-seasons-at-the-orchards-of-terhune-is-a-long-standing-tradition-on-the-farm/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 06:33:33 +0000 https://dsharma.org/celebrating-the-four-seasons-at-the-orchards-of-terhune-is-a-long-standing-tradition-on-the-farm/ FAMILY TRADITION: “We are so happy to be able to raise our children here and have a business that our whole family could be involved in. It has been wonderful to do something with our lives to make the community better and that people enjoy and enjoy. It’s very special. Pam and Gary Mount, owners […]]]>

FAMILY TRADITION: “We are so happy to be able to raise our children here and have a business that our whole family could be involved in. It has been wonderful to do something with our lives to make the community better and that people enjoy and enjoy. It’s very special. Pam and Gary Mount, owners of Terhune Orchards, are shown with the second and third generations of the family, all doing their part on the farm.

By Jean Straton

Jerhune Orchards is a favorite not only for Princetonians but also for many other loyal customers from further afield. People come from all over to enjoy this special haven at 330 Cold Soil Road. Up to 500,000 people a year visit and return again and again.

Focusing on the unique bounty of each season, this country farmhouse is a year-round local treasure. The community and families come together to enjoy great food, fresh fruits and vegetables, friendly farm animals, and wine tastings in the farm’s vineyard wine barn.

The evolution of Terhune Orchards into a leading example of modern agriculture began 47 years ago when Pam and Gary Mount purchased Terhune’s, which had been established in the early 1920s. Right home after three years in the Peace Corps in Micronesia, the Monts saw a “For Sale” sign in the orchard and decided to buy it.

Make the difference

“Our experience in the Peace Corps made us realize that we could have a huge impact if we focused on a small community, and that could be rewarding,” says Pam Mount, a Princeton native.

“Gary had grown up on a farm in West Windsor, but it was very different – ​​a wholesale operation,” she says. “I had never thought of having a farm or an orchard, but we knew how to work. And we thought all of our friends could come, and we’d invite the public in.

“Also, when we bought it, nobody was buying farms. Instead, they were sold off to developers, turned into malls and parking lots. We thought we could help save the earth and make a difference.

At the time, Terhune focused on apples, peaches and cider, and was open from July to October, she adds.

“Gary raised money from the bank to buy it, and since we now had a strong incentive to pay it back, we decided to stay open seven days a week and expand the farm shop. Very early, we started to have dwarf apple trees. They were much more productive and easier to maintain. We tried to keep the look and feel of the place and modernize it at the same time. We added bakery and vegetables, and started growing organic produce.

“One of the reasons we grow so many different things is that we are not dependent on one crop for weather issues etc. This summer, with its heat and lack of rain, has certainly presented its challenges. We find that we always have to improvise.

Together, the mounts expanded the scope of the original orchards of Terhune and introduced safe and up-to-date agricultural practices. They studied a range of innovative farming techniques, including the use of integrated pest management. Gary Mount has received numerous accolades, including “Apple Grower of the Year”, which recognizes “his progressive approaches, hard work and dedication to learning”. Today, customers can find many kinds of apples to satisfy all tastes.

60 different cultures

And the Monts have expanded not only the fruits, vegetables and other products they offer (now more than 60 different crops), but also their area. “We actually have three farms,” explains Pam Mount. “One, the original. Two, the Pick Your Own area at Van Kirk Road, and three, 57 acres. also on Van Kirk, where we grow organic fruits and vegetables, and grapes for wine. We recently added 50 acres to bring our total to 250 acres, and now the farms are all contiguous. In addition, the land is permanently preserved.

The farm shop is a big draw for shoppers, and they’ll find plenty to choose from. Among them: the delicious pies, donuts, crisps and breads with farm fruits. Other items are homemade salsa, chili and guacamole from Terhune Orchard, hot soup, cider, and gourmet items. A wide variety of fresh fruits and vegetables are always available, and shoppers will find the perfect tomato to take home.

Gift baskets, filled with all of Terhune’s goodies, are a favorite of many customers, especially during the holidays. Boxes containing apples, cider and other specialties can also be shipped, and this continues to be a big part of the business.

Also popular is the opportunity to pick your own flowers from the range of colorful wildflowers planted by Pam Mount. As she says, “I’ve always been interested in gardening and started growing flowers for the farm shop. They have become so popular that we have launched the Pick Your Own flower program.

It’s become a real favorite, with similar programs for cherries, blueberries, strawberries, apples, peaches and pumpkins. It’s always a favorite with kids, notes Pam.

Special events play a major role in Les Vergers Terhune’s activities, and many are family-oriented. Now that fall is almost here, apples and pumpkins are on display, and many fall family weekends are planned.

Children will enjoy treasure hunts, rubber duck races and pumpkin painting, plus the chance to visit the sheep, goats, donkeys, ducks, chickens and guinea fowl. They are also happy to see that ice cream is now on the Terhune menu at Barn Door Café. There is always something at Terhune to entertain and enlighten visitors of all ages, you can count on it!

Variety of wines

The adults came to enjoy the variety of wines now offered at Vergers de Terhune. Sips & Sounds wine events are held throughout the summer and into September on Friday evenings, including local bands, and they are very popular.

“We started growing grapes in 2020, and now we have 18 different types of wine,” reports Pam Mount. “A popular fall choice is our apple wine, made from our fresh apple cider. Also, light fare of cheese plates and salsa and home fries are available in the cellar.”

Gary Mount, whose book, The life of a peasant was released this summer, found winemaking to be a new and engaging activity. As he writes in his book, “Winemaking opened up a whole new world to me. My life has always been linked to agriculture, that is, to growing something. I grew up on a farm near Princeton, then became an agricultural adviser in the Peace Corps; growing coconuts was my specialty. I have been a farmer at Terhune Orchards for 47 years. With all this experience, you might think there isn’t a whole lot of new stuff to learn. Not so.

“I love cultivating vines and making wine, because a lot of it is new to me. We produce a lot of wine from our apples, blueberries and peaches, but most of it is made from grapes. When it comes to growing and processing grapes, I’m still at the bottom of the learning curve. Growing good grapes is a must. Winemaking doesn’t always go smoothly, but somehow there’s always something new to learn.

Learning something new has always been a hallmark of Terhune, while retaining the engaging atmosphere and essence of a real working farm. There is something very real in the orchards of Terhune.

It’s real

Pam Mount likes to remind a particular incident. “As Terhune evolved, we realized that we were the neighborhood farm. The story I like to tell is about a woman from Princeton who came every Tuesday with her granddaughter. She said: “I can take my granddaughter anywhere – to New York, to museums, to the theater etc. But, Pam, it’s the only place we’ve come from that’s real. Things are grown here.

“So, we decided to stick with what’s real.”

She is proud of Terhune’s loyal and long-standing staff, which now numbers 70 people. She is also very happy that the orchard has become a real family business, with her two daughters Reuwai and Tannwen now full-time members of the operation.

“It’s wonderful to have them involved,” says Pam. “They bring new energy and new ideas to work here every day. Their husbands and children are the present and the future. I’m so grateful to have the whole family together in the business. Even our grandchildren love to help out and enjoy the farm. I can’t wait for this to continue.

“We feel so lucky to be here. We believe we are stewards of the land. We are privileged to care for the farm and share it with the public. Over the years we have seen people from all walks of life and from all places. They are all ages and we see parents, grandparents and children every day. It has been a great joy.

Jerhune Orchards is open seven days a week, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. (609) 924-2310. Website: terhuneorchards.com.

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Crane Orchards gears up for a fun fall season in Fennville https://dsharma.org/crane-orchards-gears-up-for-a-fun-fall-season-in-fennville/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 10:05:05 +0000 https://dsharma.org/crane-orchards-gears-up-for-a-fun-fall-season-in-fennville/ FENNVILLE – As summer activities draw to a close and August turns into September, the beginning of the fall festivities is underway at Crane Orchards in Fennville. After:Michigan farmers predict impressive apple harvest, but don’t expect prices to drop After:Setting the record straight on farmland for sale in Fennville Whether it’s hay wagon rides, the […]]]>

FENNVILLE – As summer activities draw to a close and August turns into September, the beginning of the fall festivities is underway at Crane Orchards in Fennville.

After:Michigan farmers predict impressive apple harvest, but don’t expect prices to drop

After:Setting the record straight on farmland for sale in Fennville

Whether it’s hay wagon rides, the cow train or the corn maze, there’s something for everyone at Crane’s. And it’s important not to forget the jewel in the crown: apples.

Rob Crane, along with his wife Maria and sons Trevor and Taylor, own Crane Orchards. Crane said there’s plenty to be excited about the apples on the farm — and Michigan’s statewide apple harvest.

For <a class=apple growers across the state, it’s a fine line between getting the right amount of rain and apples getting too big or too small.”/>

“Michigan is very well positioned with a big crop this year,” he said. “This is truly the biggest harvest the state has ever encountered, possibly. There have been many new trees planted in the north and overall estimates are in the range of 28 million bushels.

By comparison, the USDA said that in 2021 Michigan farmers harvested 15.6 million bushels of apples, down from the state’s average annual harvest size – which is closer of 24 million bushels. This total includes 14.9 million apple trees in commercial production on 775 family farms.

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Hailstorm damages orchards in Budgam village https://dsharma.org/hailstorm-damages-orchards-in-budgam-village/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 20:45:54 +0000 https://dsharma.org/hailstorm-damages-orchards-in-budgam-village/ Hailstorm damages orchards in Budgam village Have the damage assessed immediately: DHO posted on Sep 11, 2022 | Author Syeda Rafiyah Srinagar, September 10: TFriday’s rains and hailstorm damaged orchards in the Sitharan village of Khag in Budgam, residents said. Farmers in the village lamented that a hailstorm that lasted 25 minutes on […]]]>


Hailstorm damages orchards in Budgam village

Have the damage assessed immediately: DHO

posted on Sep 11, 2022 | Author Syeda Rafiyah



Srinagar, September 10: TFriday’s rains and hailstorm damaged orchards in the Sitharan village of Khag in Budgam, residents said.

Farmers in the village lamented that a hailstorm that lasted 25 minutes on Friday evening, coupled with heavy rains, damaged orchards in the village.

Abdul Aziz, an arborist from Sitharan village, said the hailstorm damaged apple orchards, different varieties of fruits, maize crops and also affected vegetable gardens in the area.

“When a hailstorm hits the apple, the damage is identified a bit later. The horticulture department should inspect the village and assess the damage. Our area is prone to heavy rains and such hailstorms “, did he declare.

However, Budgam District Horticulture Officer (DHO) Muhammad Iqbal said a light hailstorm was reported in the village on Friday night and there was 5-10% damage (provisional ).

He said they will assess the appropriate percentage of damage to apple orchards and fruit. He said he asked relevant officials to produce assessment reports and go to the field.

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Apple orchards to visit in WNC during the 2022 harvest season https://dsharma.org/apple-orchards-to-visit-in-wnc-during-the-2022-harvest-season/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 09:05:24 +0000 https://dsharma.org/apple-orchards-to-visit-in-wnc-during-the-2022-harvest-season/ ASHEVILLE — Apple season is in full swing at WNC, and many orchards invite the public to savor their bountiful offerings. This season is of particular note as it follows the challenges of the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic and a difficult season in 2021 during which apple growers experienced inclement weather that damaged crops. […]]]>

ASHEVILLE — Apple season is in full swing at WNC, and many orchards invite the public to savor their bountiful offerings.

This season is of particular note as it follows the challenges of the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic and a difficult season in 2021 during which apple growers experienced inclement weather that damaged crops. This year, the consensus is that the harvest season is exceeding expectations.

“It’s a big holiday, especially in a year when there’s an abundance of apples,” said Sarah Hart, communications manager for the Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project. “After some of them have had flooding and freezing and certainly just the lean years with the pandemic where the pick-your-own carnival celebrations have been a little subdued, it makes it feel like a good apple season at all levels. Everyone is growing and producing, and I’ve heard people say it was a stellar year, so even better than “not bad.”

Long recovery process:WNC farmers struggle to stay afloat despite unpredictable rainfall

Gala apples in a bin at Grandad's Apple Orchard in Hendersonville, NC.

Apple picking adventures

For visitors, apple harvest season can look different depending on where and when one chooses to go.

WNC Apple Orchards offer varying experiences and levels of interaction and entertainment.

“There are so many, and they all have a different flavor,” Hart said.

ASAP’s online local food guide helps find orchards and farms in the Appalachian region, which includes WNC and parts of Georgia, Tennessee and South Carolina. Filters further refine the search for apple orchards.

Grandad's Apples offers freshly picked apples, freshly squeezed apple cider, fresh baked donuts and more.

A printed version of the guide is also available.

Hart recommends checking a farm’s company website, social media page or calling to check on harvest availability, hours of operation and the type of experience being offered before showing up.

Some orchards, like Grandad’s Apples and Jeter Mountain Farms, post daily updates of what’s available or a seasonal harvest calendar.

U-pick farms invite customers to take a hay ride or stroll through the orchards and pick the apples of their choice straight from the trees. Other orchards may do the picking for the customer but offer a wide variety of freshly picked and farm-made apple products.

Ginger Gold Apples

Creasman Farms pick-your-own opening date is September 11th. U-pick will be available at Grandad’s Apples in early October.

There are farms designed with high-energy activities and entertainment for the whole family.

Weekends at Grandad’s Apples are at their liveliest as the orchard offers activities such as an apple cannon, corn maze, and cow train.

Other orchards and vineyards may offer a more laid-back experience for adults to sit back and relax while sipping homemade cider or wine, in addition to the family atmosphere.

Jeter Mountain Farms not only offers 25 varieties of apples, cider, apple cider donuts, retail market, but also a hard cider bar with six flavors on tap and select canned styles for retail.

Stepps Orchard Apples

Appalachian Ridge Artisan Ciders, Saint Paul Mountain Vineyard, and The Orchard at Altapass are a few other places to consider for restaurants, tasting rooms, or live music experiences in addition to stocking up on apples for home.

For more farm and orchard explorations, purchase an ASAP Farm Tour Pass, September 17-18. The cost is $35 per car.

WNC apple orchards and more

  • Craft Ciders from the Appalachian Ridge, 731 Chestnut Gap Road, Hendersonville. saintpaulfarms.com
  • Apple House and Owenby Orchards, 3807 Chimney Rock Road, Hendersonville. owenbysapplehouse.com
  • Coston Farm Apple House, 3748 Chimney Rock Road, Hendersonville. costonfarm.com
  • Creasman Farms, 280 Bent Arrow Lane, Hendersonville. creasmanfarmsnc.com
  • Fruit of the Spirit Orchard and Vineyard, 756 Dalton Trail Dr, Hendersonville. thefruitofthespiritorchard.webs.com
  • Grandpa’s apples, 2951 Chimney Rock Road, Hendersonville. grandadsapples.com
  • Green Heart Farm3200 Little Creek Road, Hot Springs facebook.com/GreenHeartFarmNC/
  • Ancient Apples at Freeman Orchards3016 Chimney Rock Road, Hendersonville.
  • Holt Orchards, 17 Holt Pond Drive, Flat Rock. holtorchards.com
  • Jeter Mountain Farms, 1126 Jeter Mountain Road, Hendersonville. throwmountainfarm.com
  • Justus Orchard, Garren Road, Hendersonville. justusorchard.com
  • KT orchard and apiary158 Pigeon Ford Road, Canton.
  • Animated orchards1115 Upward Road, Flat Rock.
  • fresh mountain orchard2887 Chimney Rock Road, Hendersonville.mtnfreshorchards.com
  • Saint-Paul mountain vineyard, 588 Chestnut Gap Road, Hendersonville. saintpaulfarms.com
  • Sky Top Orchard, 1193 Pinnacle Mountain Road, Flat Rock. skytoporchard.com
  • Stepp Hillcrest Orchard170 Stepp Orchard Dr., Hendersonville, steppapples.com
  • Altapass orchard, 1025 Orchard Rd, Spruce Pine. altapassorchard.org
  • twisted apple, 4039 US-64, Hendersonville. twistedapplefarm.com

Choose the right apple

The abundance of apple varieties can be overwhelming, but often orchards offer samples and advice to help customers with their selection.

Grandad’s Apples offers over 40 different apple varieties per season that are pre-picked but available to mix and match.

Apples from Creasman Farms

All apples can be eaten unprocessed, but Honey Crisps are the top-selling variety at Grandad’s, said Leslie Lancaster, co-owner of Grandad’s Apples.

“It’s the premium eating apple. It’s good, crunchy and juicy,” she said.

For applesauce, Lancaster recommends Shuzuka, which “cooks very well and gently.”

“If you’re looking for something to cook with, we suggest the Jonagold,” she said. “It’s a cross between a Jonathan which is sweet and a Golden which is tart, and it will cook all the way through and hold its shape.”

Also at Grandad’s Apples, find freshly baked apple pies, apple cider donuts, donut ice cream sandwiches and a fresh apple butter market and more.

Grandad's Apples offers apple cider, donuts, baked goods, jams and more from its Henderson County orchard.

Freshly squeezed apple cider, fermented apple cider, apple cider slushies and Mountain Glacier – frozen cider slushie with a scoop of vanilla ice cream with oatmeal caramel apple cookies on top.

If you’re not sure what to do with your apple supply, try these apple recipes from Southern Kitchen:

Apple clafoutis with bourbon caramel sauce.

www.southernkitchen.com/story/recipes/2021/12/02/apple-clafoutis-caramel-sauce-comes-together-one-pan/8837616002/.

Apple pies.

www.southernkitchen.com/story/recipes/2021/07/22/quick-apple-hand-pies/8054971002/.

Apple cream cheese crumb cakes.

www.southernkitchen.com/story/recipes/2021/10/10/apple-cream-cheese-crumb-cakes-recipe/6085274001/

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And the apples? Picking season is looking great in the orchards of Mass. https://dsharma.org/and-the-apples-picking-season-is-looking-great-in-the-orchards-of-mass/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 04:45:48 +0000 https://dsharma.org/and-the-apples-picking-season-is-looking-great-in-the-orchards-of-mass/ Fancy something different? Lookout Farm in South Natick is New England’s largest grower of Asian pears. (Photo courtesy of Lookout Farm) If you were worried about the effects of the hot, dry summer on this year’s apple harvest, experts and orchard operators have good news: the harvests are anything but thin. “The fruit is amazing,” […]]]>
Fancy something different? Lookout Farm in South Natick is New England’s largest grower of Asian pears. (Photo courtesy of Lookout Farm)

If you were worried about the effects of the hot, dry summer on this year’s apple harvest, experts and orchard operators have good news: the harvests are anything but thin.

“The fruit is amazing,” Laura Neville of Lookout Farm (lookoutfarm.com) told South Natick. “It’s strong, juicy and just what you want.”

That, she said, comes from hard work and focus during a tough year.

“We have retention ponds on the farm and we’ve drained them,” she said. “In 12 years, I have never seen it so dry. We had to turn to city water.

But by staying one step ahead of watering, she says, they have been able to sustain and expect a great harvest this season.

Lookout Farm is one of the oldest continuously operating farms in the country.

The hot summer has kicked things up a bit: the picking happens about a week in advance, which means the McIntosh apples are arriving now. By the weekend after Labor Day, more types will be ready, from the popular honey crisp and upcoming gala, to the classic Red Delicious “lunch box” coming later in the season.

Lookout Farm is also the largest grower of Asian pears in New England, and they are also having success with this crop.

A visit to Lookout Farm can be a simple stop to pick all the fruit you need or a full day of family fun.

Their open-air restaurant, The Lookout, serves “sun-powered” house beers (they use 100% solar energy) and ciders, and their chef is a master barbecuer: their open pit, and their smokehouse serve ribs, chicken and more.

On Thursday evenings there is live music every week, and often more live music on Fridays and Saturdays. There are walking trails and big special events like the Flutie 5K for Autism coming September 16th.

You’ll also find a great market to buy fruit, baked goods, and cool local items.

What's a day of <a class=apple picking without an apple cider donut? This scrumptious treat comes from Lookout Farm in South Natick. (Photo courtesy of Lookout Farm)” width=”2507″ data-sizes=”auto” src=”https://i0.wp.com/www.bostonherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/trav3.jpeg?fit=620%2C9999px&ssl=1″ srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/www.bostonherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/trav3.jpeg?fit=620%2C9999px&ssl=1 620w,https://i0.wp.com/www.bostonherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/trav3.jpeg?fit=780%2C9999px&ssl=1 780w,https://i0.wp.com/www.bostonherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/trav3.jpeg?fit=810%2C9999px&ssl=1 810w,https://i0.wp.com/www.bostonherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/trav3.jpeg?fit=1280%2C9999px&ssl=1 1280w,https://i0.wp.com/www.bostonherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/trav3.jpeg?fit=1860%2C9999px&ssl=1 1860w”/>
What’s a day of apple picking without an apple cider donut? This scrumptious treat comes from Lookout Farm in South Natick. (Photo courtesy of Lookout Farm)

At Carlson Orchards (carlsonorchards.com) in Harvard, co-owner Frank Carlson likes what he sees ripening there.

Their peaches and nectarines, he said, have been of high quality despite the heat and dryness of the year, thanks to their drip irrigation well suited to such challenges. They only have one to two weeks left before being selected. Apples come next.

“We’re looking forward to the apple harvests,” he said, which should be ready for many pickings the weekend after Labor Day, starting with McIntosh and going through many varieties at the arrival of autumn.

Carlson Orchards can also fill a day with fun. Once the orchards are up and running at full steam (probably in a week or so), you’ll be entitled to free wagon rides to orchard picking locations and back.

They serve the prerequisite cider donuts and a cider room is open Thursday through Sunday each week. There you can enjoy hard ciders or hang out for a good meal. They offer craft cider cocktails, non-alcoholic beverage choices, great flatbread pizzas, and more.

Carlson said they pride themselves on “not being a zoo”, limiting the numbers. For a more leisurely picking experience, he suggests visiting on Mondays or Tuesdays. For a livelier vibe, he suggests other days, especially when the tap room is open.

The fruits of his labor picked at Bartlett's <a class=Apple Orchard in Richmond. (Photo by Ogden Gigli, courtesy of Massachusetts Office of Travel and Tourism)” width=”2048″ data-sizes=”auto” src=”https://i0.wp.com/www.bostonherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/trav1.jpg?fit=620%2C9999px&ssl=1″ srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/www.bostonherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/trav1.jpg?fit=620%2C9999px&ssl=1 620w,https://i0.wp.com/www.bostonherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/trav1.jpg?fit=780%2C9999px&ssl=1 780w,https://i0.wp.com/www.bostonherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/trav1.jpg?fit=810%2C9999px&ssl=1 810w,https://i0.wp.com/www.bostonherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/trav1.jpg?fit=1280%2C9999px&ssl=1 1280w,https://i0.wp.com/www.bostonherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/trav1.jpg?fit=1860%2C9999px&ssl=1 1860w”/>
The fruits of his labor picked at Bartlett’s Apple Orchard in Richmond. (Photo by Ogden Gigli, courtesy of Massachusetts Office of Travel and Tourism)

Massachusetts offers a multitude of choices for apple picking experiences beyond these two main destinations.

There’s the CN Smith Farm in Bridgewater (cnsmithfarminc.com), where you’ll find tons of apples, their “Donut Barn” where you’ll find fresh apple cider donuts, ice cream and sundaes, coffee cold and for a real New England Treat – (move on, Vermont’s Creamee?) Cider Slush.

On Fridays they sell amazing muffins which alone are worth the trip.

Red Apple Farm in Phillipston (redapplefarm.com) is also a classic favourite, with their famous cider donuts (you can pick them up at the Boston Public Market in a pinch), incredible views of Wachusett Mountain, and their hall Brew Barn & Cidery tasting room with a lovely patio to savor it all in a farmhouse setting. Don’t forget to check out their growlers: you can take cider home to continue the wonderful taste of fall.

There are more too. Find details about the many choices at mass.gov/guides/pick-your-own-farms or visitma.com.

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Western Innovator: 98 years of Californian wine | Orchards, nuts and vines https://dsharma.org/western-innovator-98-years-of-californian-wine-orchards-nuts-and-vines/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://dsharma.org/western-innovator-98-years-of-californian-wine-orchards-nuts-and-vines/ Country the United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

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CMI Orchards Announces Leadership Transitions – Produce Blue Book https://dsharma.org/cmi-orchards-announces-leadership-transitions-produce-blue-book/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 18:25:04 +0000 https://dsharma.org/cmi-orchards-announces-leadership-transitions-produce-blue-book/ Wenatchee, WA – CMI Orchards BB #: 134183 today announced that the company has advanced several positions within the company as it prepares for a period of phenomenal growth. CIM President, Bob Mast, shared his vision for the company with these changes. “Our business continues to evolve, grow and become increasingly complex. To meet these […]]]>

Wenatchee, WA – CMI Orchards BB #: 134183 today announced that the company has advanced several positions within the company as it prepares for a period of phenomenal growth.

CIM President, Bob Mast, shared his vision for the company with these changes. “Our business continues to evolve, grow and become increasingly complex. To meet these exciting challenges, our leaders bring a proven track record of success, as they adapt to the changing needs of our business, growers and customers and overcome challenges with creative and innovative solutions at the cutting edge of industry. Consistent with this charge, I am delighted to announce the creation of two new positions and two additional promotions that best position the company to navigate our impending growth,” he said. “The CMI family is delighted with this latest series of promotions recognizing the exemplary work of some of our leaders.”

The company announced by Robb Myers promoted to Vice President of Business Development from his former position as Director of Sales, as he takes a more active role in retail strategy and the overall growth of the company. “Robb has been a mainstay of CMI for 33 years, his first day of employment coinciding with the day the company was founded in 1989,” Mast explained. “Before joining CMI, Robb came from the purchasing world. Over the past three decades, he has firmly consolidated his industry knowledge through his direct sales experience and retail network. »

Mast explained that Robb’s work to establish club apple programs has helped position CMI as an industry leader for new varietals and notable brands – a position that CMI continues to uphold with a comprehensive manifesto that includes: Ambrosia Gold, KIKU, Kanzi, Envy, Jazz, Smitten, EverCrisp, Sunrise Magic, Cosmic Crisp and Skylar Rae.

“As CMI’s longest serving employee, I have been involved in most aspects of our business since day one. It’s amazing to see where we’ve come from and where we’re going as we enter this new chapter of CMI’s growth. I couldn’t be more invigorated by the exciting things we’re doing to pave the way for the future. As well as continuing to coach and guide the team through the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead, I look forward to immersing myself in global strategies with leading retail partners, linking internal activities between our sales and marketing departments and ultimately helping to guide CMI’s business through this exciting next chapter.

CMI Vice President of Marketing, George Hartertransitions to a strategic role within the company, helping drive new projects forward as a new Vice President of Special Projects. Mr. Mast said, “This position will allow George to advance some of CMI’s key initiatives, guiding strategy with select retail projects and business growth plans.

Mast raved about the last 5 years he worked with Harter at CMI, “George has done an amazing job leading marketing initiatives helping to build and grow successful programs and innovations using his keen sense of retail, which includes learnings from his former career in retail. As Vice President of Special Projects, George will lead the company into new business opportunities by creating avenues for continued growth.”

Harter said, “Having spent most of my career in retail, I have enjoyed leading supply-side marketing for the past five and a half years. CMI’s dynamic processes and exceptional products, people and services are second to none,” he said. “This opportunity to help drive meaningful initiatives and projects that bring efficiency and value to both CMI and our retail partners, is a huge honor.”

CMI - Rochelle Bohm CMI brand manager, Rochelle Bohm took the reins from George Harter as the new Vice President of Marketingg. Bohm joined CMI in 2013 as a Creative Lead and guided the company through a rebrand in 2016 as it transitioned to Brand Manager. “Rochelle is a force of nature with a thirst for innovation,” said Mast. “Over the past 9 years, Bohm has built a portfolio of successful, award-winning marketing programs and brands, producing some of the most innovative packaging and marketing campaigns, paving CMI’s path to tremendous growth.”

Bohm’s grew up in the apple country of New Zealand and eventually landed in Alaska where she led the political and marketing activities of Copper River salmon for Alaska’s oldest commercial fishing syndicate. Bohm joined CMI Orchards when she moved to Washington State in 2013, trading one healthy food item for another: salmon for apples.

Bohm is excited about the future and looks forward to building on the solid work of her predecessors, including George Harter, Steve Lutz and Bob Mast. “This is an incredible time to lead CMI’s marketing department into a future full of opportunity,” Bohm said. “North West Fruit Trees offers one of the most complex categories in the produce aisle with so many new brands, packaging and varieties. Understand how to succeed in retail, how to innovate with executable and easy-to-market solutions, develop new sustainable packaging as the need for automation grows, and programs that grab consumer attention and drive consumption, are all key areas. for CMI’s marketing as we enter this new chapter. I am both extremely honored and thrilled to have the opportunity to take our business to the next level by tapping into the many talents of CMI’s phenomenally skilled team to bring to market the fabulous fruit that our owners and growers entrust to us.

CMI - Danielle HuberCMI Marketing Specialist, Danielle Huberwill take on a strategic management role as a new Senior Marketing Manager. Danelle joined CMI in 2017 with a broad skill set honed by her work at the Washington Apple Commission, Van Doren Sales and her legal experience at Jeffers, Danielson, Sonn and Alyward.

Mast shared that Huber will continue to advance relationships with our retail customers and manage marketing operations such as data reporting, omnichannel solutions, in addition to sales visits and trade shows. “Danelle is a natural project manager who excels at building relationships and facilitating meaningful retail programs and strategies,” Mast described. “Danelle will continue her excellent work of providing exceptional service and support with a solution-focused approach, energetic spirit and innovative thinking. »

Huber is excited for the opportunity to work more closely with CMI’s retail partners and focus on creative, data-driven strategies within the category. “Working alongside some of the most talented people in the industry has given me insight into the many different areas of the agri-commodity world,” she shared. “My experience from representing our Washington growers in export markets to understanding how creating a world-class packaging line works has given me extensive and invaluable experience in some of the unique nuances of the tree industry I am anxious and eager to work hand in hand with CMI’s customers to continue to maintain the interest and growth of the apple, pear and cherry categories.

CMI Orchards LogoAbout CMI Orchards

CMI Orchards is one of Washington State’s largest growers, shippers and packers of apples, pears, cherries, apricots and organic produce. Based in Wenatchee, WA, CMI Orchards delivers exceptional fruit across the United States and exports to over 60 countries worldwide.

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