Orchards – D Sharma http://dsharma.org/ Tue, 10 May 2022 04:13:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://dsharma.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Orchards – D Sharma http://dsharma.org/ 32 32 Treasure Valley frost warning affects cherry orchards https://dsharma.org/treasure-valley-frost-warning-affects-cherry-orchards/ Tue, 10 May 2022 04:13:00 +0000 https://dsharma.org/treasure-valley-frost-warning-affects-cherry-orchards/ At 28 degrees, Gem Orchards in Emmett will begin to shed fruit, just before harvest. EMMETT, Idaho — Cherries close to harvest — much like Lance Phillips’ crop at Gem Orchards in Emmett — are vulnerable to cold temperatures. Amid a frost warning through Monday evening, Phillips is working around the clock to save his […]]]>

At 28 degrees, Gem Orchards in Emmett will begin to shed fruit, just before harvest.

EMMETT, Idaho — Cherries close to harvest — much like Lance Phillips’ crop at Gem Orchards in Emmett — are vulnerable to cold temperatures. Amid a frost warning through Monday evening, Phillips is working around the clock to save his fruit.

“You lose some sleep. But as farmers, that’s what you do,” Phillips said. “If we drop five or six degrees below our critical temperature, we could lose everything. That would be a year’s worth of income.”

At 28 degrees, Phillips expects to lose 10% of its cherries every hour. If the temperature drops to 24 degrees, Phillips expects 90% of his harvest. Phillips and other Orchards base these estimates on figures from Washington State University and Michigan State University.

“[It’s] devastating for us as farmers and ranchers who depend on this crop being ready and ready after we have already done 4 months of work to get everything ready and ready and irrigation and trees pruned,” said Phillips said.

To combat the cold temperatures, Phillips uses a combination of burr pots and fans. The pots burn diesel fuel and send out a 15 foot beam of hot air. Fans push this hot air through the cherry orchard to keep temperatures from dropping to critical levels.

Pots and fans can only raise temperatures by 2 or 3 degrees, Phillips said. He hopes that’s all it takes.

“We’re never 100% sure,” Phillips said. “Always watching, preparing and making sure everything is fueled and ready to go. We make sure everything is ready well in advance.”

Gem Orchards is a top supplier to the annual Emmett Cherry Festival, according to the Gem County Chamber of Commerce. If the fruit is lost due to freezing temperatures, prices could potentially rise to compensate for the lost product, according to Phillips.

An acre of cherries at Gem Orchards is worth between $10,000 and $15,000. Protecting the harvest is not only necessary for his livelihood, but also for the 8 seasonal workers on his staff, according to Phillips.

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Director General of Horticulture in Kashmir issues advisory for orchards affected by hail https://dsharma.org/director-general-of-horticulture-in-kashmir-issues-advisory-for-orchards-affected-by-hail/ Sat, 07 May 2022 11:02:12 +0000 https://dsharma.org/director-general-of-horticulture-in-kashmir-issues-advisory-for-orchards-affected-by-hail/ Director General of Horticulture in Kashmir issues advisory for orchards affected by hail A heavy hailstorm hit parts of northern Kashmir including Tangmarg and Gulmarg and damaged standing crops and orchards. posted on May 07, 2022 | Author RK Online Office Kashmir’s Directorate General of Horticulture issued an advisory to fruit growers in […]]]>


Director General of Horticulture in Kashmir issues advisory for orchards affected by hail

A heavy hailstorm hit parts of northern Kashmir including Tangmarg and Gulmarg and damaged standing crops and orchards.

posted on May 07, 2022 | Author RK Online Office



Kashmir’s Directorate General of Horticulture issued an advisory to fruit growers in the valley on Saturday in view of damage to fruit trees in yesterday’s hailstorm.

A heavy hailstorm hit parts of northern Kashmir including Tangmarg and Gulmarg and damaged standing crops and orchards.

In a notice issued this morning, the Director General of Horticulture in Kashmir has asked arborists to spray affected apple and pear trees with one of the following fungicides per 100 liters of water: Zineb 68% + Hexaconozole 4% 72 WP (100g) or Dodine 65 WP (60g) or Dodine 40 SC (90ml) or Fluxapyroxad 250g/l + Pyraclostrobin 250g/l 500 SC (20ml).

The general director of horticulture has asked arborists to also spray 0.2% urea (equivalent to 200 grams per 100 liters of water) on apple and pear trees affected by hail and immediately remove leaves and damaged fruit from orchards.

As for cherry, apricot, plum and peach trees affected by hail, arborists have been instructed to spray the trees with one or more of the following fungicides.

Carbendazim 50 WP (50 g) or Carbendazim 12% + Mancozeb 63% 75 WP (250 g) or Thiophanate Methyl 70 WP (50 g). Arborists have also been told to immediately remove fallen leaves and fruit from orchards.

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Jubilee Orchards Celebrates 10 Years of Blueberry Farming https://dsharma.org/jubilee-orchards-celebrates-10-years-of-blueberry-farming/ Tue, 03 May 2022 18:35:02 +0000 https://dsharma.org/jubilee-orchards-celebrates-10-years-of-blueberry-farming/ Jubilee Plantation was owned and loved by Florida Senator and Traveling Governor Lawton Chiles. After his death, his son Bud and his wife Kitty developed a commercial organic blueberry orchard called Jubilee Orchards, comprising 40 acres with over 125,000 organic blueberry bushes comprising a dozen unique cultivars. Every spring, thousands of people enjoy picking or […]]]>

Jubilee Plantation was owned and loved by Florida Senator and Traveling Governor Lawton Chiles.

After his death, his son Bud and his wife Kitty developed a commercial organic blueberry orchard called Jubilee Orchards, comprising 40 acres with over 125,000 organic blueberry bushes comprising a dozen unique cultivars.

Every spring, thousands of people enjoy picking or ordering fruit now known as “The Best Blueberries in the South.” Jubilee has received the highest accolades from the Florida Department of Agriculture and the Florida Farm Bureau – Designated Best Management Practices Farm and CARES FARM for Outstanding Environmental Stewardship.

Blueberries in the region:Blueberry thrills: It’s the perfect time to pick from area farms

Varieties of blueberries:Thinking about planting blueberries? Choose the Right Strain for North Florida

Jubilee also features the historic and vintage cabins relocated here by Lawton Chiles as part of his 19th century homestead. These cabins have been lovingly adapted and designed for weekend rentals in nature.

Anna and Brad Polnow traveled from Illinois to pick blueberries at Jubilee Orchard in 2021.

The Jubilee experience includes nature activities for children and families, musical and gastronomic events, and weddings and corporate events are being planned.

Jubilee encompasses a total of 210 acres but is surrounded by 15,000 acres of conserved Red Hills plantations, yet is only 15 minutes from downtown Tallahassee and Thomasville Georgia.

Jubilee is an outstanding example of sustainable ecological agriculture and biodiversity – home to dozens of critical species – gopher tortoises, bobcats, fox squirrels, cockade woodpeckers, deer and turkeys, and teeming with birds. They have planted abundant pollinator crops like wildflowers so the bees are healthy and no toxic pesticides or herbicides are used on the farm.

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Beekeeper busy as hives pollinating shortage in central Okanagan orchards – Kelowna News https://dsharma.org/beekeeper-busy-as-hives-pollinating-shortage-in-central-okanagan-orchards-kelowna-news/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://dsharma.org/beekeeper-busy-as-hives-pollinating-shortage-in-central-okanagan-orchards-kelowna-news/ Cindy White It’s busy being in the bee business, just ask Brad Ingram. “It’s been a busy season,” says Ingram, owner of Okanagan Beekeeping Supplies. “A lot of beekeepers, commercial beekeepers, have started retiring in the Okanagan. “So the press is there as far as the producers go. There have been many calls this year. […]]]>

Cindy White

It’s busy being in the bee business, just ask Brad Ingram.

“It’s been a busy season,” says Ingram, owner of Okanagan Beekeeping Supplies. “A lot of beekeepers, commercial beekeepers, have started retiring in the Okanagan.

“So the press is there as far as the producers go. There have been many calls this year.

Among those retiring are Kaye and Bob Chisholm of Brainy Bee on Valley Road. They return to Saskatchewan after 22 years in the valley, but have no one to take over the orchard pollination business.

“No, we have a girl here and she’s helping but she’s not interested in continuing at the pace we were doing,” Kaye said.

Ingram is in a similar situation. No member of his family wants to take over when he’s ready to retire and he admits it’s a lot of work.

This could be cause for concern. Many orchards depend on commercial beekeepers like Ingram and the Chisholms to deliver hives in the spring to ensure their crops are properly pollinated.

“It’s absolutely time for beekeepers,” says Alan Gatzke of Gatzke Orchards in Lake Country.

He notes that there is a very short window when the flowers are open and the bees are an integral part of a good harvest.

“Without hives placed in the orchard, there is usually a little harvest. Bees aren’t the only things that do pollination, but they do the biggest load of it. »

Gatzke is lucky to have a neighbor with beehives, so he doesn’t have to depend on commercial beekeepers. His property also benefits from a large number of native bees visiting his trees as it is close to the forest.

Others aren’t so lucky. If they fail to hire someone like Ingram, there are few other options. There are plenty of backyard hobbyists, but they are generally not interested in moving their bees to orchards.

Another concern this year is the impact of varroa in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. It killed millions of bees. In previous years, some orchards brought in beehives from Alberta, but Gatzke has yet to see any evidence of that happening this spring.

Until more people decide to get into the bee business or growers find other ways to pollinate their crops, Ingram expects his phone to keep ringing.

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Alert in Castellon after the detection of “Pseudococcus longispinus” in citrus orchards https://dsharma.org/alert-in-castellon-after-the-detection-of-pseudococcus-longispinus-in-citrus-orchards/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 12:27:16 +0000 https://dsharma.org/alert-in-castellon-after-the-detection-of-pseudococcus-longispinus-in-citrus-orchards/ Pseudococcus longispinus, known as the long-tailed cochineal, is not an unknown species in the Valencian Community. In fact, the Institut Valencià d’Investigacions Agràries (IVIA) warned in a recent study that this cotonet is the main species of Pseudococcidae that affects the cultivation of persimmon; that is why the Ministry of Agriculture included it in the […]]]>

Pseudococcus longispinus, known as the long-tailed cochineal, is not an unknown species in the Valencian Community. In fact, the Institut Valencià d’Investigacions Agràries (IVIA) warned in a recent study that this cotonet is the main species of Pseudococcidae that affects the cultivation of persimmon; that is why the Ministry of Agriculture included it in the aid it recently launched to counter the effects of South African cotonet in the autonomous domain, in this case to help persimmon growers.

Thus, we are concerned about its detection in a citrus orchard located in the town of Nules. Until now it had not been detected in the province of Castellon, where it had been confused with another cotonet.

The fear is that even if Pseudococcus longispinus does not deform the fruit like the insect arriving from South Africa does, it could cause black spots on the fruit at harvest time, rendering the fruit unsaleable. Thus, the four local associations (Vila-real, Nules, la Ribera and Camp de Túria) have reiterated the need to obtain exceptional authorization from the Ministry of Agriculture to use methyl chlorpyrifos to treat trees, now that they are in full bloom. Especially after the Ministry, in its own aid order, acknowledged that biological control has not yet been effective in preventing the dispersal and allocation of South African cotonet.

Independent citrus growers fear a rapid expansion of the detected cotonet, since it does not need sexual reproduction for its reproduction, and only one parent can produce new individuals.

A time bomb
Thus, after verifying its development in persimmons, the entities expect significant damage to citrus crops. “It can be a ticking time bomb for the pockets of citrus growers,” the Nules association said.

Source: castellonplaza.com

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Hailstorm in North Kashmir damages orchards https://dsharma.org/hailstorm-in-north-kashmir-damages-orchards/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 19:53:57 +0000 https://dsharma.org/hailstorm-in-north-kashmir-damages-orchards/ The hailstorm that hit parts of northern Kashmir on Monday night caused heavy damage to orchards. This is the second time this month that hail has caused damage to fruit of various varieties which are in the early stages of formation. The huge hailstorm hit parts of Kupwara, Baramulla, Budgam and Ganderbal districts. Director General […]]]>

The hailstorm that hit parts of northern Kashmir on Monday night caused heavy damage to orchards.

This is the second time this month that hail has caused damage to fruit of various varieties which are in the early stages of formation.

The huge hailstorm hit parts of Kupwara, Baramulla, Budgam and Ganderbal districts. Director General of Horticulture, Ajaz Ahmad Bhat, said: “According to initial data, losses caused in orchards range from 5% to 30%. So far, we have data on 14 villages affected by the hailstorm. ”

On social media, DG Horticulture also shared the images showing how the hailstorm had caused damage to orchards in different places. While apple varieties are in their early stages of formation, cherry, apricot, peach as well as pear and other early varieties have begun to ripen, causing more damage to the fruit harvest.

On April 14, rains and a hailstorm damaged apple orchards in the Pattan and Tangmarg regions of northern Kashmir. Due to this hailstorm, the orchards of Sherpora, Mamoosa, Kanloo, Babagund, Sari, Nehalpora, Lalpora Kunzer, Lalpora Tangmarg, Dobiwan and Pinjoora suffered damage. The damage was around 20-25% in these areas, according to official data.

The dry spell in March and the first week of April had already worried fruit growers in the valley and they feared it could affect this year’s fruit yield. March, which is generally considered the wettest month of the year, saw very few rain events this time around. J&K’s summer capital of Srinagar recorded its hottest March since 1891, when weather data collection in Kashmir began.

The lack of rainfall in March impacted early cash crops of the season such as cherries, peaches, apricots and plums. However, the hailstorm has added woes to growers eyeing the harvest of cherries and other stone fruits from next month.

Cherry is the first cash crop that farmers in Kashmir harvest in May and June.

Experts believe that the current drought is the result of global warming. “The dry spell followed by untimely heavy rains accompanied by thunderstorms and hailstorms is caused by global warming and our Kashmir is also having its effect,” said Abdul Gaffar, an official at Sher University of Agricultural Science and Technology. and Kashmir.

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Hailstorm hits parts of Kashmir, orchards damaged https://dsharma.org/hailstorm-hits-parts-of-kashmir-orchards-damaged/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 22:06:26 +0000 https://dsharma.org/hailstorm-hits-parts-of-kashmir-orchards-damaged/ Added April 26, 2022 Images News Network Experts suggest a fresh fungicide spray Srinagar: Massive hailstorms hit parts of northern and southern Kashmir on Monday afternoon, damaging orchards and other standing crops. Reports from Tangmarg, Pattan, Baramulla, Mawar, Handwara in North Kashmir and Kulgam in South Kashmir suggest that after the rains, the regions were […]]]>


Images News Network

Experts suggest a fresh fungicide spray

Srinagar: Massive hailstorms hit parts of northern and southern Kashmir on Monday afternoon, damaging orchards and other standing crops.

Reports from Tangmarg, Pattan, Baramulla, Mawar, Handwara in North Kashmir and Kulgam in South Kashmir suggest that after the rains, the regions were hit by massive hailstorms.

The hailstorm hit orchards hard and damaged crops. The areas turned white as the ice balls piled up on the ground.

The storm has left orchadists puzzled as they fear it will have a serious impact on fruit production, especially cherry, almond and apricot.

“Even apple production is going to be affected by the hailstorm,” said an orchid.

Director General of Horticulture, Aijaz Ahmad Bhat, while confirming the damage, tweeted: “Heavy hail damage to orchards in Mawar, Handwara, Tangmarg, Pattan, Baramulla and Kulgam.”

Meanwhile, the horticulture department has advised orchadists to opt for a fresh spray of trees after the hailstorm.

“Orchards affected by today’s hailstorm in different districts of Kmr Valley can spray fungicide immediately after (per 100 liters of water).

“Zineb 68% + Hexaconazole 4% 72wp (100g) or Mancozeb gold/Matiram & urea 200g per 100 liters of water,” Horticulture General Manager Aijaz Ahmad Bhat tweeted.

A scene from Tangmarg after Monday afternoon’s hailstorm. Photo/ Cashmere Images


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Scab threat hangs over apple orchards in Kashmir – Jammu Kashmir Latest News | Tourism https://dsharma.org/scab-threat-hangs-over-apple-orchards-in-kashmir-jammu-kashmir-latest-news-tourism/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 21:30:58 +0000 https://dsharma.org/scab-threat-hangs-over-apple-orchards-in-kashmir-jammu-kashmir-latest-news-tourism/ Suhail BhatSRINAGAR, April 22: As the threat of apple scab looms over the apple orchards of Kashmir, the Department of Horticulture has warned apple growers to follow proper spraying program to avoid early onset of apple scab infection. scab.Continued rains disrupted the spray schedule and increased the risk of scab infection on apple trees, which […]]]>

Suhail Bhat
SRINAGAR, April 22: As the threat of apple scab looms over the apple orchards of Kashmir, the Department of Horticulture has warned apple growers to follow proper spraying program to avoid early onset of apple scab infection. scab.
Continued rains disrupted the spray schedule and increased the risk of scab infection on apple trees, which affected almost 40% of the crop last year. “Because constant rain can wash away sprays, allowing infection to develop on leaves and spread to the crop, the department is taking no chances this time and is urging growers to be vigilant and stick to the schedule. of spraying released,” an official with the horticulture department said.
According to arborists, although scab is not widespread in orchards, some traces encourage producers to be extra careful. “At the moment there are traces of scab in some places, but the apple orchards are safe for the moment. We have to be more careful this time,” said Basit Ahmad, an arborist.
He went on to say that it is too early to speculate on the extent of scab spread as the fruit is so small, but “signs of scab on leaves or fruit at this stage means it will cause more damage than last year”. “On the other hand, normal temperature and repeated spraying would play a huge role in containing the disease,” he said.
Growers have complained that although market enforcement teams are more active this time around, fake chemicals are still being sold in different parts of the valley. “The main reason for widespread scabies last year was fake chemicals, and that has prompted officials to stay active this year. But some people are still selling substandard chemicals, so more needs to be done,” said said another producer.
A horticulture department official told Excelsior he had issued an advisory to apple growers and asked them to spray fungicides to prevent scab injury and other diseases in the crop.
He said that in areas where apple orchards are in the pink bud stage, spray one of the following fungicides, which include Zineb 68% + Hexaconazole 4rWP @ 100gm/100 Liters of water; Dodine 65 WP @ 60 g/100 liters of water; Dodine 40SC @ 90 ml/100 liters of water; Fluxapyroxad 250g/1 + Pyraclostrobin (250g/1) 500 SC @ 20ml/100 Liters of water.
At the petal fall stage, spray anyone with the following fungicides: Difenaconazole 25 EC @ 30 ml/100 liters of water; Flusilazole 40 EC @ 20 ml/100 liters of water; Trifloxystrobin 25% + Tebuconazole 50 uWG @ 40g/100 liters of water.
He informed us that the bloom stage spray should be done if scab lesions are seen and the arborists did the previous spray more than 10 days ago. “A low-volume (mist-type) sprayer should be used for spraying during bloom,” he added.
He urged apple growers to ensure good drainage to avoid stagnation of water in their orchards. “To ensure sanitation of the orchard by the destruction of weeds and grass. They should not continuously repeat the same fungicide in two sprays,” he also added.

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British Columbia cherry growers use helicopters to push hot air over orchards https://dsharma.org/british-columbia-cherry-growers-use-helicopters-to-push-hot-air-over-orchards/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 16:11:55 +0000 https://dsharma.org/british-columbia-cherry-growers-use-helicopters-to-push-hot-air-over-orchards/ British Columbia farmers use helicopters to save their cherry crop. Credit – Paolo Neo, public domain Some BC cherry growers are using helicopters to push hot air over their trees as unseasonably cool temperatures threaten this year’s cherry crop before the fruit is even set . According to Environment Canada meteorologist Dave Wray, a large […]]]>

British Columbia farmers use helicopters to save their cherry crop. Credit – Paolo Neo, public domain

Some BC cherry growers are using helicopters to push hot air over their trees as unseasonably cool temperatures threaten this year’s cherry crop before the fruit is even set .

According to Environment Canada meteorologist Dave Wray, a large mass of cold air has settled over the province, bringing unusually cold temperatures for the season. It was so cold on Saturday that 23 temperature records were broken in British Columbia, some dating back 100 years.

Below normal temperatures at this time of year do not bode well for farmers who have experienced weather changes in the province that have brought fires, floods and the so-called heat dome of the last year.

The early morning calm in a number of Okanagan cherry orchards this week was interrupted by the roar of helicopters, hovering over the orchards. They blow warm air over orchards, pushing cold air away from the ground of trees that have started to flower.

It may seem like a desperate attempt, but it works. Sukhpaul Bal, president of the BC Cherry Growers Association, said helicopters create airflow rather than letting cool air sit over orchards, which could damage buds waiting to bloom. , reports CTV News Cabada.

“We are coming in the spring. The buds are starting to open and the flowers aren’t too far down the road,” he said. “So at this time of year we don’t like to see too much cold weather.”

Bal said he was grateful the cherry orchards didn’t have snow like some parts of the United States.

Glen Lucas of the BC Fruit Growers Association says, “The extent of the damage caused is unknown. It will depend on the stage of bud growth and how cold it is,” reports Global News.

This scenario has already happened with apricots, which are the first to be harvested in the valley. Next come peaches, cherries and pears. The apples are the last to be harvested.

“We haven’t seen that with the cherries, so it’s not expected,” Lucas said. “That’s why they’re bringing out these wind turbines and helicopters,” Lucas said. “It’s a lot of money to get them out and they’re trying to protect their fruit from damage.”

The labor shortage is adding to the burden on the farming community, Bal said, reports the Vancouver Sun.

The Canadian Federation of Agriculture said the industry was suffering from a chronic labor shortage even before COVID-19 arrived.

Mary Robinson, president of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture, said earlier this year that the physical nature of work on farms and in rural and isolated locations are some of the reasons for the labor shortage.

COVID-19 has cost Canadian agricultural producers about $2.9 billion in 2020 due to the inability to find workers, Robinson said.

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Mixed rose bush/avocado farm on 650 hectares at an altitude of 2 km https://dsharma.org/mixed-rose-bush-avocado-farm-on-650-hectares-at-an-altitude-of-2-km/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://dsharma.org/mixed-rose-bush-avocado-farm-on-650-hectares-at-an-altitude-of-2-km/ Feico Smit can be safely called an expert on Africa. In the 1990s, he was the first to tour Africa for flower auctions. Feico moved there for the fourth time. In November 2021, he became COO of Mount Elgon Orchards Kenya, a combined rose and avocado farm. The avocado season in Kenya has just started. […]]]>

Feico Smit can be safely called an expert on Africa. In the 1990s, he was the first to tour Africa for flower auctions. Feico moved there for the fourth time. In November 2021, he became COO of Mount Elgon Orchards Kenya, a combined rose and avocado farm.

The avocado season in Kenya has just started. “The picking is now well advanced and the first containers were loaded last week,” Feico begins. The cultivation company is located – as its name suggests – near Mount Elgon, an extinct stratovolcano on the border between Uganda and Kenya. It is a national park in both countries.

“We produce avocados on 120 hectares. The major part, about 95%, of the total assortment consists of Hass. Our growing conditions are unusual by African standards. We farm at an altitude of two kilometers, have good irrigation possibilities and have access to good soil. As a result, our avocados have a much higher than average fat content than other Kenyan avocados. The harvest starts in April and the company delivers its last avocados in September/October.

“We also sort strictly. The production manager is in the orchard all day with a dry matter counter. And the workers are well trained. Customers know our boxes contain avocados, not pits. therefore, bonded with many different qualities. This does not always benefit the reputation of Kenyan lawyers. However, we control everything, from cultivation to marketing. That’s why our customers love working with us,” says Feico.

Most of the farm’s avocados are currently sold in the Netherlands and Asia. “Last year, we exported 60-70% to the Netherlands. This year, the market situation is a little worse, but there is still demand from all sides. This too is linked to our quality selection. This week, for the first time, Kuehne Nagel loaded a full container directly from Mount Elgon Orchards instead of the usual route via Nairobi airport cold stores.

This rose/avocado farm covers a total of 650 hectares. “Many of our crops have only been planted in recent years, so they will come into full production in the years to come. We still have many expansion plans and we haven’t reached our peak yet. Global avocado consumption is growing, so there is a lot of potential,” Smit continues.

There is also a synergy between the cultivation of the rose and that of the avocado. “Our avocados peak during the off-season of roses. We consider this to be a form of risk propagation as well. However, both product groups have challenges. Much is said and written about the crisis in horticulture. are, this also affects the exotic fruit sector. Airfreight and container prices have more than doubled over the past 18 months.

Feico is proud of the establishment of Mount Elgon Orchard. “That too is very professionally organised. People can get vocational training here to become car mechanics, electricians, carpenters, hairdressers or growers. We also have a hospital which treats up to 63,000 patients a year. As it is well the implementation is really the icing on the cake.”

However, challenges abound. “It’s still Africa,” laughs Feico. “A day never goes as planned, something always happens. We are far from Nairobi. So you have to make sure you are independent in everything, so you can always go on. It’s not always easy. For example, Kenya is currently experiencing a shortage of diesel, so we make sure we have a strategic supply of it, and the same goes for fertilizers,” he concludes.

For more information:
Feico Smith
Mount Elgon Orchards
PO Box 124, Kitale
Kenya
Email: feico@mtelgon.com
Website: www.mtelgon.com

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