Crops – D Sharma http://dsharma.org/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 05:43:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://dsharma.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Crops – D Sharma http://dsharma.org/ 32 32 AMU-Bot robot kills weeds as it weaves its way through crops https://dsharma.org/amu-bot-robot-kills-weeds-as-it-weaves-its-way-through-crops/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 18:12:30 +0000 https://dsharma.org/amu-bot-robot-kills-weeds-as-it-weaves-its-way-through-crops/ Although manual weeding of crops can be time consuming and labor intensive, spraying herbicides on these crops is definitely not environmentally friendly. A German consortium is developing a third choice, in the form of the AMU-Bot weed killer robot. Moving on caterpillar-type caterpillars, the robot is able to autonomously move up and down rows of […]]]>

Although manual weeding of crops can be time consuming and labor intensive, spraying herbicides on these crops is definitely not environmentally friendly. A German consortium is developing a third choice, in the form of the AMU-Bot weed killer robot.

Moving on caterpillar-type caterpillars, the robot is able to autonomously move up and down rows of plants in orchards, vegetable fields or nurseries. It uses on-board LiDAR scanners to stay between those rows and to see where each row ends so it can turn around and move on to the next one.

And although the AMU-Bot is not able to identify specific types of plants, it is able to tell the difference between cultivated plants and others that shouldn’t be there – weeds, in other words. When one of these is spotted, the robot lowers a rotary harrow (much like a toothed version of the spool on a push lawn mower) which stirs up the soil and uproots the offending plant.

To control weeds growing between the rows, the harrow is simply deployed just in front of the robot as it moves forward. On the other hand, if a weed is spotted growing between the cultivated plants in a row next to the robot, the machine stops and moves its harrow sideways in space.

AMU is an acronym for the German words for “Autonomous Mechanical Weed Control”

Federal Office for Agriculture and Food / Fraunhofer

The AMU-Bot project is funded by the German Federal Office for Agriculture and Food and is coordinated by the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Engineering and Automation (which also designed the power harrow to height adjustable). Bosch is developing the navigation and sensory system, and the agricultural robotics company KommTek is responsible for the track drive system.

There is currently no word on when the AMU-Bot can go live. It might face some competition, however, as other groups develop robots that use lasers and electrical pulses to kill weeds.

Source: Fraunhofer


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Beware of the flathead moth that bites nut crops https://dsharma.org/beware-of-the-flathead-moth-that-bites-nut-crops/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 16:55:06 +0000 https://dsharma.org/beware-of-the-flathead-moth-that-bites-nut-crops/ Damage to this tree is caused by a Pacific flathead borer.Photo by James Solomon, USDA Forest Service Nut growers in recent years have reported higher infestations of the Pacific Bull Moth, according to the University of California (UC). The pest, while not new to the state’s central valley, is becoming a re-emerging problem, with drought […]]]>

Damage to this tree is caused by a Pacific flathead borer.
Photo by James Solomon, USDA Forest Service

Nut growers in recent years have reported higher infestations of the Pacific Bull Moth, according to the University of California (UC). The pest, while not new to the state’s central valley, is becoming a re-emerging problem, with drought likely a contributing factor, according to UC. Known to cause damage to stressed, injured, and sunburnt trees, there is a worrying trend of flathead borers attacking healthy trees as well.

Currently, there are no traps available for growers to assess populations and chemical control options. Currently, UC recommends that nut growers and pest management advisors be aware of the life cycle and damage the flathead borer can cause and be on the lookout for emerging damage. in their orchards.

Fall through winter is the best time to check for borer infestation as it is easier to detect in leafless trees. UC recommends these confirmation practices:

• Scout the orchard for dead and reported branches infested by the Flathead Borer and look for signs of external infestation (ie.

• Look for brown sap that has oozed out and spread over the surface of the bark of the infested part of the tree.

• Look for any visible injuries on branches and branches of trees that are prone to sunburn, or that have pruning wounds, or any other type of cracks and injuries.

• For young trees, check for trunk damage, especially on the south or west side of the tree. These sides are preferred for egg laying by females due to higher sun and heat exposure. Carefully check the graft site and pruning wounds.

• Use a knife to peel the bark from a suspicious branch and look for feeding channels filled with droppings (sawdust-like insect waste) and cream-colored larvae underneath. Keep in mind that the larvae tend to move into the heartwood in late fall to overwinter and are more difficult to find. Larval finds may be easier from June to August, when the larvae feed just under the bark in the cambium layer.

• Look for the beetle’s D-shaped exit holes on infested walnut branches.



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Indian apple growers assess cost of climate crisis as snow decimates crops | Global development https://dsharma.org/indian-apple-growers-assess-cost-of-climate-crisis-as-snow-decimates-crops-global-development/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 06:02:00 +0000 https://dsharma.org/indian-apple-growers-assess-cost-of-climate-crisis-as-snow-decimates-crops-global-development/ The locally grown apple is at risk of becoming a rarity in India, as farmers have lost up to half of their harvest this year, with predictions that the country’s major orchards could soon be all but wiped out. The first snowfall in Kashmir, where nearly 80% of India’s apples are grown, saw farmers in […]]]>

The locally grown apple is at risk of becoming a rarity in India, as farmers have lost up to half of their harvest this year, with predictions that the country’s major orchards could soon be all but wiped out.

The first snowfall in Kashmir, where nearly 80% of India’s apples are grown, saw farmers in the region lose half of their crops in the third year of disastrous harvests.

Officials are trying to calculate the loss to the apple industry, which contributes nearly a third – 50 billion rupees (£ 500 million) – to the local economy each year. Apples are sold in fruit markets across India and some are exported.

Researchers have warned that orchards in the Kashmir Valley, which is surrounded by the Great Himalayas and the Pir Panjal Mountains, risk becoming unsustainable in the coming years as the climate crisis affects production.

The past 20 years have seen gradual changes in weather conditions in the region, which have intensified over the past five years. This is the third year that harvests have been affected by early and heavier snowfall in the Kashmir Valley.

According to the Kashmir Department of Horticulture, 5 billion rupees were lost during the harvest in 2018. This figure rose to 22.5 billion rupees in 2019, which saw the heaviest snowfall than Kashmir. have known in 60 years.

“In light of climate change, apple harvest is unsustainable [here]”said Dr Irfan Rashid, assistant professor at the University of Kashmir.

“Usually Kashmir receives snowfall after December 15th, but in the last two decades we are experiencing early snowfall. The harvest time for many varieties of apples is November. In the last five years we have had three irregular snowfalls and in the future the situation could get worse.

A farmer collects apples in Baramulla district, Jammu and Kashmir. Almost 80% of Indian apples are grown in the region. Photograph: Nasir Kachroo / NurPhoto / REX / Shutterstock

He added, “Climate models predict a very grim scenario when it comes to erratic weather. The Himalayas, which includes this region, are going to receive more frequent extreme events as we move through the century. It is quite normal for Kashmir to witness extreme weather events. “

In response to the crisis, officials from Kashmir’s horticulture department have encouraged farmers to plant new imported “high density” varieties, which are harvested earlier than existing crops. The government has promoted subsidy programs to help farmers buy and market new varieties and wants to increase the amount of land used for cultivation.

Ajaz Ahmad Bhat, director general of the horticultural department, said: “We cannot stop what is coming. The only way out is the conversion to high density varieties. “

Research published this year suggested that new varieties could generate significant economic returns and outweigh the high upfront expenses.

Rashid said the government’s strategy could help mitigate the impact of irregular snowfall, but added it would lead to the loss of local varieties.

“Already local varieties like ragweed are declining,” he said.

Farmers have been reluctant to adopt new varieties, highlighting the disappointing results of the pilot projects.

“Switching to high-density varieties is not easy for us,” said Nawaz Ahmad Thoker, a farmer from Ramnagri, a sleepy village surrounded by orchards in the state of Jammu and Kashmir. “We will have to uproot the existing orchard and then plant the new saplings, which will cost us dearly. “

Thoker, whose family has tended their seven-acre (2.8-hectare) orchard for 35 years, broke down when he documented damage to his crops after heavy snowfall in late October. The trunks of half the trees were split open and the branches still with their fruits attached were buried under six inches of snow.

Nawaz Ahmad Thoker inspects his <a class=apple trees after heavy snowfall in October” src=”https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/61e81477d55f3b8688a089c754b9744cbcaf1657/0_0_3264_2448/master/3264.jpg?width=445&quality=45&auto=format&fit=max&dpr=2&s=ad14644a31a0880752f8bc1da2da1ffc” height=”2448″ width=”3264″ loading=”lazy” class=”dcr-1989ovb”/>
Nawaz Ahmad Thoker inspects his apple trees after heavy snowfall in October. His orchard also suffered severe snow damage in 2018 and 2019. Photography: Aakash Hassan

He estimated he had lost 100,000 rupees (£ 1,000) which will mean a difficult year for him and his family as he struggles to pay for his children’s school and his parents’ health care .

“It was not just the harvest of the year lost before my eyes, but the three decades of hard work my family and I destroyed,” he said.

About 70% of its apple trees were damaged by early snowfall in 2018 and 2019.

“I’m thinking of doing some other job, maybe starting a business so my kids have a good future,” Thoker said. “It looks like our next generation won’t be able to see these apple orchards.”


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University research farm shares 3,000 pounds of harvest with community https://dsharma.org/university-research-farm-shares-3000-pounds-of-harvest-with-community/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 22:37:00 +0000 https://dsharma.org/university-research-farm-shares-3000-pounds-of-harvest-with-community/ The Desert Agriculture Initiative at the University of Nevada, Reno, this year donated more than 3,000 pounds of fresh produce to area pantries, according to officials at the Experimental Station of the UNR. The harvest went to local pantries to support students and community members in need. The demonstration and research farm, operated at the […]]]>

The Desert Agriculture Initiative at the University of Nevada, Reno, this year donated more than 3,000 pounds of fresh produce to area pantries, according to officials at the Experimental Station of the UNR. The harvest went to local pantries to support students and community members in need.

The demonstration and research farm, operated at the eastern end of the campus on Valley Road, is part of a research unit focused on sustainable agriculture and research into desert farming practices. This year’s growing season has been more difficult than most.

Pack Provisions delivers food, including fresh produce, to students in need. Image: UNR

“We grow over 90 varieties of fruits and vegetables on the farm,” said Jill Moe, who is now director of the Initiative and started volunteering in 2018. “We had a lot of challenges this year – the smoke and air quality are so bad some days we had to shut down the farm, equipment issues and heat waves. I am really proud of what our staff and volunteers have been able to accomplish.

Farm officials said they harvested more than 13,000 pounds of produce this year, most of which was sold to the Great Basin Community Food Coop, Fallon Food Hub and area farmers’ markets.

Proceeds from sales, along with donations and grants, support the farm’s Farm-to-Food Pantry partnership with the University’s Pack Provisions and the Community Health Alliance’s WIC Nutrition Assistance Program. Pack Provisions provides free food to students in need. A student survey in 2020 found that one in four students reported experiencing food insecurity.

Moe said she hopes to add climate controls to the farm’s hoop houses soon to extend the growing season. Growth in spring and fall has been good, she said, but winter production is limited. She estimates that a modernization with climate control could double their pantry deliveries in winter. The Initiative launched a crowdfunding campaign to fund the improvements.

In southern Nevada, the UNR Extension Research Center and Demonstration Orchard donated more than 5,000 pounds of produce to the community. The Orchard is a cooperative effort between The Extension, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and the City of North Las Vegas.

Source: UNR Extension


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USU and Michigan state team up to research tart cherry crops – Cache Valley Daily https://dsharma.org/usu-and-michigan-state-team-up-to-research-tart-cherry-crops-cache-valley-daily/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 02:03:45 +0000 https://dsharma.org/usu-and-michigan-state-team-up-to-research-tart-cherry-crops-cache-valley-daily/ FILE PHOTO: Cherry photo by Nick Fewings LOGAN – Utah’s tart cherry crop brings in between $ 7 million and $ 21 million per year, and a team of researchers at Utah State University and Michigan State University has received $ 1.97 million from the Department of ‘Agriculture in the United States to study more […]]]>

FILE PHOTO: Cherry photo by Nick Fewings

LOGAN – Utah’s tart cherry crop brings in between $ 7 million and $ 21 million per year, and a team of researchers at Utah State University and Michigan State University has received $ 1.97 million from the Department of ‘Agriculture in the United States to study more efficient ways to grow the crop.

The project leader is Professor Brent Black of the Department of Plants, Soil and Climate at USU. He said the goal is to bring advanced technology to the production of tart cherries.

“Sour cherries are an interesting crop because they’re a bit more mechanized than some of the other fruit crops, so they’re more like some of the major crops we grow in terms of mechanization,” Black explained. “So the project is to try to implement a technology that would make this more mechanized crop more efficient to grow and be able to maintain profitability. “

He said that historically the tart cherry market has been for cherry pie filling, but over the past 20 years there has been a shift to dried fruit for cold cereals and bars- snacks. Most tart cherries are harvested by a trunk shaker.

Dr Black said the production of tart cherries is limited by the trees’ 30-year lifespan.

“But it’s usually the seventh or eighth year before they start producing,” Black added. “So some of the things we’re looking at in this grant are trying to see how we can manage this orchard consistently, and also how to determine when it’s time to unplug, when is it time to replace that orchard. “

The combination of researchers from USU and Michigan State University is a natural fit, as Michigan and Utah have traditionally been the number one and number two sour cherry producing states in the United States.





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Farmers will receive subsidies for assistance with special crops https://dsharma.org/farmers-will-receive-subsidies-for-assistance-with-special-crops/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 20:03:25 +0000 https://dsharma.org/farmers-will-receive-subsidies-for-assistance-with-special-crops/ By James Paxson Click here for updates on this story SAGINAW, Mich. (WNEM) – Several farm organizations across the state will receive funding to support the specialty crop industry. Governor Gretchen Whitmer joined Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development Director Gary McDowell on Tuesday in announcing the state recipients of the state Department of […]]]>

By James Paxson

Click here for updates on this story

SAGINAW, Mich. (WNEM) – Several farm organizations across the state will receive funding to support the specialty crop industry.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer joined Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development Director Gary McDowell on Tuesday in announcing the state recipients of the state Department of Agriculture’s Special Crops Grant program United 2021.

The program provides federal funds to departments of agriculture to support the specialty crop industry.

“I appreciate the USDA’s commitment to invest in Michigan’s robust food and agriculture sector,” Whitmer said. “These grants are a win-win solution for our farmers, producers, distributors and consumers as we seek to increase access to food and agriculture in Pure Michigan. I appreciate the leadership of the USDA and Senator Stabenow in securing this vital funding in support of Michigan’s vibrant crop industry.

“The programs supported by these federal grants are helping strengthen local and statewide distribution channels by giving Michigan’s specialty crop farmers access to more markets and supporting the governor’s plan for the Michigan’s new economy, ”McDowell said. “The grants focus on marketing, training, certifications, food safety, pest control and plant health for specialty crops, including fruits, vegetables, nuts, plants and / or flowers. In addition, this funding improves the competitiveness of the state’s specialty crops.

“Michigan is the national leader in the production of many fruits and vegetables and is second in terms of crop diversity after California. Our fruits, vegetables and nursery crops are not only a source of great pride, they are essential to the economy of our state, ”said Senator Debbie Stabenow. “This new support is a big win for Michigan agriculture. This will help our farmers maintain their competitive advantage and continue to provide healthy fruits and vegetables to American families. “

The scholarships have been awarded to:

• $ 86,950 was awarded to the Michigan Asparagus Advisory Board to DeWitt for increasing Michigan asparagus productivity through sustainable disease management tactics.

• $ 99,800 awarded to the Michigan Asparagus Advisory Board to DeWitt for advancing asparagus disease management in the future with real-time field sensor data.

• $ 124,400.00 was donated to the Michigan Bean Commission in Frankenmuth to improve Michigan Dried Bean Value Communication Strategies: Conventional and Digital Educational Programs to Increase Bean Consumption for Health-Conscious Consumers d ‘today.

• $ 100,000 was donated to the Michigan Bean Commission in Frankenmuth for the identification of improved dry bean varieties, maturities and integrated weed management systems.

• $ 99,793 was donated to the Michigan Blueberry Growers Association in Grand Junction for research into the effectiveness of growing blueberries in buried containers through on-farm trials.

• $ 98,525 was donated to the Michigan Carrot Industry Development Program at DeWitt to advance weed management in Michigan carrots through new cultural, electrical and physical approaches.

• Michigan Carrot Industry Development Program evaluating and disseminating soil amendment practices to mitigate heavy metal uptake by Carrot DeWitt $ 100,000.00

• $ 89,000 was given to the Michigan Cherry Committee to DeWitt for the Montmorency Tart Cherrys brand with a geographical indication.

• $ 91,555 was donated to the Michigan Nursery and Landscape Association in Okemos for finding new herbicides and new uses for Michigan Shrub containers.

• $ 98,814 was donated to the Michigan Onion Committee in St. Johns for combining pest management strategies to increase the quality of Michigan onion yield.

• $ 100,000 was awarded to the Michigan Potato Industry Commission for working on potato climate resilience and field and storage assessment in East Lansing.

• $ 99,979 was donated to the Michigan State Horticultural Society in Benton Harbor to improve the management of grape berry moth in Michigan vineyards.

• $ 99,984 was donated to the Michigan Tree Fruit Commission in Lansing to characterize apple storage practices and the potential risk of Listeria contamination.

• $ 90,591 was donated to the Michigan Vegetable Council in St. Johns to increase the establishment and productivity of vegetable plants.

• $ 99,685 was donated to the Michigan Vegetable Council in St. Johns to advance agbot and drone technologies for sustainable soil and weed management in Michigan Vegetables.

• $ 95,685 was donated to West Central Michigan Horticultural Research, Inc. in Hart for finding solutions to cherry replanting disorder using chemical and organic amendments.

Note: this content is subject to a strict embargo in the local market. If you share the same market as the contributor of this article, you cannot use it on any platform.



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Will the CEA need exploratory cultures to diversify? https://dsharma.org/will-the-cea-need-exploratory-cultures-to-diversify/ Fri, 05 Nov 2021 13:06:48 +0000 https://dsharma.org/will-the-cea-need-exploratory-cultures-to-diversify/ Jon Greene, Senior Technical Specialist at Bluelab, spoke with Joseph Chidiac (JC), CEO and Horticultural Engineer at CultiBio, about CEA in need of exploratory crops to diversify during the series of webinars on the future of controlled agriculture of Bluelab. Jon and JC refer to CEA’s advanced crops, by which they refer to crops beyond […]]]>

Jon Greene, Senior Technical Specialist at Bluelab, spoke with Joseph Chidiac (JC), CEO and Horticultural Engineer at CultiBio, about CEA in need of exploratory crops to diversify during the series of webinars on the future of controlled agriculture of Bluelab.

Jon and JC refer to CEA’s advanced crops, by which they refer to crops beyond traditional leafy vegetables and herbs. Think broccoli, root vegetables, goji berries, wasabi, and even bananas that can now be grown locally in hydroponics, thanks to recent technological improvements.

The opportunity lies in the new techniques and varieties of crops
Growing crops in the 21st century is a unique challenge, but an unprecedented opportunity. The combined power of nature and human ingenuity elevates the level of growth with systems that create gains in efficiency, productivity and a more sustainable means of growth.

“The main effect is that you reduce food miles. So you reduce the need to haul a lot of these bulk products up there, and I think that’s very positive, ”said Joseph Chidiac, CEO and Horticultural Engineer at CultiBio.

Jon supports this sentiment and uses the example of how the urban farm and Grow + Gather restaurant in Colorado have successfully used CEA to build a thriving business and cut food miles. Owner Jeff Johnston has transformed a former 1950s auto repair shop into an urban farm and restaurant, complete with gardens, a greenhouse, and a vertical farm. Its indoor hydroponic towers are 1,200 square feet or 111.5 square meters grow space. Towers alone equals 1.8 or maybe two acres of farmland and eliminates countless miles of food. ”

The change beyond lettuce and herbs is already happening
JC points out that significant progress is being made in reducing food miles and highlights some key ACE milestones.

  • More and more farms are appearing in the United States and Canada to reduce transportation needs and reduce greenhouse gases.
  • In Holland and Iceland we see greenhouses growing bananas. Transportation costs are reduced and there are smart systems available where people use cogeneration and take advantage of steam.
  • Europe grows papayas, spinach and arugula, which are usually imported. With the movements to CEA in Europe, crops such as apples, almonds, cherries (which are susceptible to diseases requiring a lot of pesticides and fungicides) will have these inputs eliminated.
  • The Caribbean grows cilantro and winter crops.
  • China has more traditional orchards in transition to CEA.
  • As the price of root crops increases, local production of these vegetables will become a viable option. Broccoli and cabbage grow very well in hydroponics. Although they take up space, it will inevitably come to the point where it is a more viable option that outweighs the space and effort required in relation to transporting these crops.

Download the full conversation here.

Read the full article at www.blog.bluelab.com.


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Deere goes high tech for high value crops https://dsharma.org/deere-goes-high-tech-for-high-value-crops/ Fri, 05 Nov 2021 12:12:40 +0000 https://dsharma.org/deere-goes-high-tech-for-high-value-crops/ John Deere’s latest equipment for high-value crops varies widely in size, from compact tractors that slide easily through rows of vines to huge bed crop planters that are as tall as buildings. But the one feature that ties all the machines together, other than the signature green paintwork, is the technology. The 184-year-old company has […]]]>

John Deere’s latest equipment for high-value crops varies widely in size, from compact tractors that slide easily through rows of vines to huge bed crop planters that are as tall as buildings.

But the one feature that ties all the machines together, other than the signature green paintwork, is the technology. The 184-year-old company has banked on precision farming – a necessity for growing seeds that can cost up to $ 875 an acre.

High-tech and precision features are paramount in the Deere line of tractors, loaders and sprayers designed to meet the diverse labor needs of high-value crop growers. Among the company’s offerings are cloud-based services such as JDLink, which allows a producer to track the work of their machines in the field, and AutoTrac, which allows hands-free steering of tractors using GPS coordinates. .

Related: John Deere Launch Shows Innovation In Many Areas

“JDLink is free for customers,” said Greg Christensen, chief marketing officer for John Deere. “Almost any tractor you see can be equipped with JDLink.”

Christensen and other Deere marketing professionals recently hosted a Field Day for Media in Bakersfield, Calif. To highlight some of the new features in the company’s line of high-value crop equipment. , which include not only vineyards and orchards, but also a myriad of field crops. including carrots, melons, onions, pumpkins, lettuce, peanuts and pine trees.

“To a stranger, when they think of John Deere, they might think of a cornfield or a wheat field,” Christensen told Farm Progress. “But we have a ton of products specifically designed for high value crops – California, Oregon, Washington or the Northeast, or citrus in Florida. They are designed for very different crops than the steel plow. invented for. “

Push for efficiency

Deere has long touted the versatility and durability of its machines, but the company’s effort in recent years has focused on efficiency. Its web-based John Deere operations center includes features like a work scheduler, which allows customers to set up tasks for their employees during the day and send data to machines, Christensen said.

Last year, Deere entered into an agreement with Smart Guided Systems to sell its Smart-Apply intelligent spray control system for use with its tractors in high-value crop applications. The system is an add-on kit for towed airblast sprayers, and company officials say the product can significantly reduce the potential for chemical drift and help decrease the amount of product applied.

“The Smart-Apply system will help ensure that only the canopy will be sprayed, and it automatically adjusts the spray volume based on plant density per nozzle area,” Christensen said. This feature saves input costs while contributing to environmental sustainability, he said.

Related: John Deere’s Latest Purchase Will Advance Agriculture

Deere continued earlier this year by acquiring Silicon Valley-based Bear Flag Robotics to accelerate autonomous technology on the farm. The Bear Flag team is made up of agricultural professionals, engineers and technologists focused on autonomy, sensor fusion, vision, data, software and hardware, according to Deere.

The purchase of Bear Flag was one of Deere’s many recent acquisitions that have allowed the company to expand its product line for high-value crops. The company acquired Monosem, a European precision planter manufacturer in 2016, and then in 2017 purchased Mazzoti, an Italy-based sprayer manufacturer. Monosem and Mazzoti have kept their names, brands and trade agreements.

Here’s a look at some of the new and updated John Deere tractors and other equipment featured during the Media Field Day. For details on all Deere products, visit deere.com.


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Over 75 pc Kharif, Rabi crops damaged in Jammu, Samba due to hailstorm – Jammu Kashmir Latest news | Tourism https://dsharma.org/over-75-pc-kharif-rabi-crops-damaged-in-jammu-samba-due-to-hailstorm-jammu-kashmir-latest-news-tourism/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 21:34:12 +0000 https://dsharma.org/over-75-pc-kharif-rabi-crops-damaged-in-jammu-samba-due-to-hailstorm-jammu-kashmir-latest-news-tourism/ Apple in Kulgam, Shopian, Paddy in Kupwara suffer lossesAvtar BhatJAMMU, October 29: The recent hailstorm and snowfall caused immense damage to growing crops, including vegetables and fruits in J&K Union territory, dashing the hopes of farmers who sought a good harvest this season.According to official sources, the maximum damage was done to the Kharif crop […]]]>

Apple in Kulgam, Shopian, Paddy in Kupwara suffer losses
Avtar Bhat
JAMMU, October 29: The recent hailstorm and snowfall caused immense damage to growing crops, including vegetables and fruits in J&K Union territory, dashing the hopes of farmers who sought a good harvest this season.
According to official sources, the maximum damage was done to the Kharif crop in the twin districts of Jammu and Samba where the standing rice crop, especially the Basmati crop as well as the Rabi vegetable crop totally perished due to the hailstorm of October 23.
Sources said that there is a loss of 75 to 80 percent of Kharif and Rabi’s crops in the twin districts of Jammu and Samba while it is about 50 percent in the Kathua district. However, the loss is comparatively less in other districts of the Jammu region where the Kharif paddy crop is not cultivated due to their terrain, sources added.
They said apples and citrus in the Jammu region, including strawberries, were also damaged. Apples in the Wadwan area of ​​Kishtwar district were damaged due to snowfall while citrus and strawberries in Jammu, Samba and Kathua districts were damaged to a large extent and the authorities of the Department of l horticulture and income formed the joint teams to assess the loss. .
However, fruit loss is not at this point in other districts of Poonch and Rajouri, sources said.
They said that in the Kashmir division there was no loss of paddy as the crop was mainly harvested there in mid-October. However, in the Kupwara district of North Kashmir, the rice crop on more than 3,600 kanals of land has been damaged. Sources said the saffron which is harvested in November each year has also suffered damage from the heavy rains and cold snap that engulfed the valley due to snowfall and flower growth will be stunted. Saffron growers fear that flowering will be comparatively smaller this year. Concerned growers don’t expect a bumper crop as they claim the National Saffron Mission’s irrigation system has also gone down the drain and the 75 percent bulb has already been damaged due to the lack of irrigation facilities for cultivation on time.
Sources said apples in Kashmir were mostly damaged in the twin districts of Kulgam and Shopian in southern Kashmir due to heavy snowfall as the fruits still lay on the trees in most areas. districts and had not yet been picked. In most areas where the fruits were picked and stored in orchards for packing, they also suffered damage from snowfall and cold snaps. In these twin districts, the loss is over 25 to 35 percent. Keller, a hilly area in Shopian District, suffered maximum damage to apples because picking is done late there due to the cold weather, sources added.
Sources told Jammu that the flowers also suffered heavy damage from a hailstorm. The marigold which is mostly in demand on the Diwali festival and on the sale of which farmers make good income during the festival has been completely damaged due to the hailstorm.
Sources said that flower growers in Jammu and Samba and parts of Kathua district and in particular in Marh, Gajansoo, RS Pura, Bishnah and Nagrota in Jammu suffered immense losses for the crop which completely perished. because of the hail.
Former minister and Kissan leader Ch Sukhnandan said damage was over 80% in the twin districts of Jammu and Samba, where paddy and vegetable crops were completely damaged.
Tejinder Singh Wazir, chairman of the Kissan board, said more than 75 percent of Basmati and other rice crops were damaged. He demanded compensation from farmers on the model of the Delhi government.
He said the government without politics should team up and assess the loss to provide warlike compensation. He appealed to Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Union Home Minister Amit Shah and PMO Minister Dr Jitendra Singh in this regard.
Mir Ghulam Rasool, a member of the Ganderbal Fruit Growers District in Central Kashmir, also urged the government to carry out the assessment and immediately compensate fruit growers and farmers. He also called for a fruit insurance scheme to be launched in UT as well.
The authorities of the departments of agriculture and horticulture, while recognizing the losses due to hail and snow, said they had formed the teams from the departments of agriculture, horticulture and income to assess the loss.
Advisor to the governor, Farooq Khan visited various regions to take stock of the hail damage in Jammu and interacted with farmers’ organizations, said AS Reen, co-director of agriculture, Jammu.
He said 1900 farmers have secured their paddy crop in Jammu and their cases are being processed for settlement of claims within 72 hours. In other cases where farmers do not have crop insurance, the respective district DCs have been consulted to form joint teams to assess losses and provide relief to affected farmers according to SDRF standards.
He also admitted that the paddy crop in Jammu and Samba suffered damage of 75 to 80 percent while it is close to 50 percent in Kathua district.
Jammu Horticultural Director Ram Sewak also said the department is carrying out an assessment of fruit damage in the Jammu region and therefore compensation will be paid according to standards set by the government.
Kashmir Director of Agriculture Iqbal Ahmed Choudhary said the paddy had not suffered any major damage in Kashmir as the crop was already harvested in the valley. However, 3,600 kanals of standing crops have been damaged in the Kupwara belt of North Kashmir and damage assessment is carried out by the Department to provide compensation in accordance with SDRF standards. He said teams from the department led by him and other officers traveled to various areas to assess the loss.
The director of horticulture in Kashmir, Aijaz Ahmed Bhat, also said that the maximum number of fruit growers had picked the apple from trees all over the valley, except in some areas of Shopian and Kulgam districts where the apple rested on trees and had sustained damage. The ministry assesses the loss to compensate producers, he added.


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Thousands of people without electricity after devastating storm in South Australia, crops ‘wiped out’ https://dsharma.org/thousands-of-people-without-electricity-after-devastating-storm-in-south-australia-crops-wiped-out/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 03:25:19 +0000 https://dsharma.org/thousands-of-people-without-electricity-after-devastating-storm-in-south-australia-crops-wiped-out/ Canberra, October 29 (IANS): Thousands of homes in South Australia (SA) have been without power after a devastating hailstorm that hit the state. Hailstones the size of golf balls hit much of South Africa on Thursday, causing damage to crops, vineyards and orchards, the Xinhua News Agency reported. More than 72,000 lightning bolts were recorded […]]]>

Canberra, October 29 (IANS): Thousands of homes in South Australia (SA) have been without power after a devastating hailstorm that hit the state.

Hailstones the size of golf balls hit much of South Africa on Thursday, causing damage to crops, vineyards and orchards, the Xinhua News Agency reported.

More than 72,000 lightning bolts were recorded statewide and parts of the southeast received 35 millimeters (mm) of rain.

The State Emergency Service (SES) was inundated with 1,200 calls for help in 24 hours.

As of Friday morning, nearly 12,000 homes remained without power, and power is not expected to be restored until the afternoon, according to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC).

Vince Rowlands, senior forecaster at the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM), said hailstones were the largest on record in South Africa since 2017.

“Seeing hail the size we saw in the northern suburbs is not something we see very often in the Adelaide area,” he told News Corp Australia.

In the South African region, farmers said hail had destroyed their market gardens and greenhouses.

Jordan Brooke-Barnett, chief executive of industry body AUSVEG, said the crops had been “wiped out”.

“It’s really, really bad,” he said.

“We are talking about dozens and dozens of producers who have each lost hundreds of thousands of dollars.”

One of those producers, Michael Costa, owner of Tenafate Creek Winery, said it was a devastating blow in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

“Our hearts go out to all winegrowers and winegrowers,” he added.


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